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Thread: Crispy's Mini-Movie Review Thread (still sans pie)

  1. #16
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    Six slices . . .



    Your Highness
    B-

    A stoner comedy set in magical, medieval times. The film tries to straddle the fine line between parody and, uh, not parody. Unfortunately, it fails more often than it succeeds. I should probably give this film a C-, but it has Natalie Portman kicking butt and showing it; that alone bumps this film up a letter grade.




    Hannah
    B+

    A rudimentary summary of the film’s plot is an adolescent girl is kept in isolation and trained to be an assassin. But it’s so much more than that. The film is a bit heavy on the Brother’s Grimm analogies and symbolism, but has great, Bourne-esque action and an intriguing plot. Not to mention the soundtrack by the Chemical Brothers is excellent.




    Thor
    A-

    Marvel Studios pulls off another great superhero film that has a story so wisely rooted in humanity (the relationship between a father and his sons) and well told that it doesn’t matter that the father in question is the inter-dimensional king Odin and his sons are Thor and Loki. It’s a very epic, very Shakespearean story in nature, so it was equally wise Marvel got veteran on-screen Shakespearean Kenneth Branagh to direct.




    Bridesmaids
    B

    A “guy” comedy with chicks? Brilliant! Not to mention a protagonist that actually has realistic problems and a character arc that’s well developed.




    PotC: On Stranger Tides
    C

    I suppose the kindest thing I can say about this film is a mediocre Jack Sparrow film is better than none at all. Where the last two PotC films suffered from too many characters and too convoluted a plot, this one, well, has the same problems--but at least it doesn’t last for nearly 3 hours like the previous two films. Also, these Disney mermaids are nothing like Ariel and Ian McShane as Blackbeard was sorely underused and needs his own spin-off “prequel” film.



    The Hangover: Part II
    C

    The film is not so much a sequel as it is a remake of the first film. Same scenario, different city, but more male frontal nudity. Despite this film’s unoriginality, there will be a Hangover: Part III. I suggest you save your money and wait for this one on video.

  2. #17
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    Cool Summergasm


    Kung-Fu Panda 2
    B+

    Another great animated action kids flick from Dreamworks, and a worthy sequel to the original. However, the plot is a bit emotionally heavy for little kids and it does come to a heartwarming conclusion in which the adopted panda learns family is not defined by blood relation but by love. Then that lesson is swiftly kicked in it's furry panda nuts as said lesson is essentially negated by a gimicky end-credit scene that sets up the next film.


    X-Men: First Class
    A

    Simply put, this is the best adaptation of the X-Men comics to film yet. From everything to the costumes and casting to the character traits and plot points, this film is pure fanboy Nerdvana.



    Super 8
    A-

    This film has drawn comparison to The Goonies. True, both are Steven Spielberg produced films starring middle-schoolers on an adventure, but Super 8 isn't as light-hearted as The Goonies, plays out more like a mystery film, and deals out much bigger explosions. And a bonus for fans regarding the final scene, after the lens-flare-athon that was 2009's Star Trek, director JJ Abrams finally decided to make a lens flare a relevant (and touching) part of a film rather than cinematic



    Green Lantern [3D]
    B-

    It didn't suck as much as I feared. That's not the greatest compliment one can give a film, but as a life-long fan of Hal Jordan and his superhero status as a Green Lantern, it's honestly the best one I can give. The CGI scenes played out beautifully in 3D, but the story focused way too much on the Earth bound (and inexplicably excessively dickish) Hal and not enough on his training and the intergalactic ass-kickery of the GL Corps. Perhaps those kinks will be worked out in the inevitable sequel.



    Cars 2
    B-

    Cars is not my favorite Pixar film, but it was decent enough, and I'd say this sequel lives up to its predecessor. The spy plot (cribbed from The Man Who Knew Too Little, which was a parody of The Man Who Knew Too Much) works and puts the merchandising favorite Toe-Mater as the main protagonist rather than Lightning McQueen.



    Transformers 3: Dark of the Moon [IMAX 3D]
    B+

    Yup, Michael Bay finally done gone and done a decent Transformers flick. The last hour of the film is basically a string of action scenes one after the other. And it's glorious. Well, if you're into watching giant robots destroy a city and each other that is. True, the film has many a fault (Optimus Prime does some things WAY out of character, and there are plot holes galore), but by now fans should know to expect that from a Bayformers film.



    Horrible Bosses
    B

    This film is worth seeing for the scenes between Jennifer Aniston as a naughty dentist and Charlie Day as her abused dental hygienist alone. Jasons Bateman & Sudekis, Colin Ferrell, and Kevin Spacey (playing yet another hilariously evil boss) are all just the icing on the cake to a decent summer comedy.



    Bad Teacher
    C

    Bad movie. This is a classic example of a comedy that gave away 99% of its funniest jokes in the trailer. Jason Segel is criminally underused in the film as well.



    Captain America
    A-

    World War II and superheroes, two of my favorite film genres, are brought together in yet another wonderful Marvel Studios film. I was never a big fan of the Cap comics, but seeing scrawny Steve Rogers (even if the CGI was a bit dodgy) become a true hero was a very cool thing to see unfold onscreen. This film reminds jaded moviegoers and fanboys alike that a superhero doesn't always have to be cynical, conflicted, complicated, or inherently flawed in some way. Sometimes a do-gooder can just want to do good, and that's Steve Rogers.



    Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows pt.2
    A-

    It's been years since I read the book, so I can't comment on what was omitted or added on to in the film. I do know that this is one exciting movie though. As a fan of the books and films, the only major complaint I have about the ending is that the final battle was so anticlimactic. However, there were some truly fantastic scenes rounding out the characters of Dumbledore and Snape—Ron & Hermione (apart from a kiss) not so much. And Harry, much like I remembered from the books, comes across in the end as not so much a "hero," but as someone who has the bravery to trust in those he loves and, most importantly, in himself.

  3. #18
    Find a way to get in the way. MTC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crispy View Post

    Captain America
    A-

    World War II and superheroes, two of my favorite film genres, are brought together in yet another wonderful Marvel Studios film. I was never a big fan of the Cap comics, but seeing scrawny Steve Rogers (even if the CGI was a bit dodgy) become a true hero was a very cool thing to see unfold onscreen. This film reminds jaded moviegoers and fanboys alike that a superhero doesn't always have to be cynical, conflicted, complicated, or inherently flawed in some way. Sometimes a do-gooder can just want to do good, and that's Steve Rogers.
    I don't know if I would have given it an A but it was pretty good. I ♥ super hero movies (thought this was better than Thor actually) and will be standing by to see if any other Avengers make a solo appearance before the group effort of The Avengers comes around 2012.
    And the ghosts that we knew will flicker from view
    And we'll live a long life

  4. #19
    You made a glaring error in that Captain America review.

    There is no mention of Hugo Weaving.

    I'll forgive you but it's going to take some time, bro.

  5. #20
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTC View Post
    and will be standing by to see if any other Avengers make a solo appearance before the group effort of The Avengers comes around 2012.
    Probably unlikely -- of course Iron Man, Thor and Loki (and Hawkeye, if you can count his five minutes in Thor), and Steve have all already had movies (as has Hulk/Bruce Banner, though Ed Norton will not be playing him anymore), and I don't think the rest of the team could carry off a solo feature -- though I would watch an entire movie about Nick Fury or Agent Coulson, because I love both of them.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  6. #21
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    Cool The return! (Still no damn pie though!)

    ^^ Yeah, no more solo films until Avengers hits. But Iron Man 3 shouldn't be far behind Avengers. Ditto for Thor 2.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuddlefish View Post
    You made a glaring error in that Captain America review.

    There is no mention of Hugo Weaving.

    I'll forgive you but it's going to take some time, bro.
    Gracias. Lo siento! You're right, he was a total badass in the film. I can only hope Marvel Studios contracted him for another film or two.

    Films in Theaters:

    Crazy, Stupid, Love
    C+

    Our Idiot Brother
    C


    Contagion
    C+




    The Debt
    B

    This remake of an Israeli spy thriller has such well written characters and such a simple yet intricately woven plot that you’d swear it was “based on a true story.” The story follows a team of Israeli spies and jumps from the 1990s to the 1960s as they try to extradite a Nazi war criminal from Soviet occupied Berlin. Any fan of the genre should enjoy this film.


    Films on DVD:



    Winter’s Bone
    A

    This is an outstanding noir-ish mystery film set in the modern day Ozarks. Jennifer Lawrence (who plays Mystique in X-Men: First Class) gives an Oscar nominated performance (She was robbed!) as a 17-yr-old high school senior trying to keep her family together in the absence of her meth-cooking father. The story is gripping, the setting wonderfully integral, and the performances are fantastic. Don’t let yourself miss this one. And for fans of the film’s music, there’s an excellent documentary available for free on iTunes that I also highly recommend.




    Attack the Block
    B

    Alien invasion movie + Goonies + Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels + fat guy from Shaun of the Dead = this film. I’d have liked to rate it higher because I love the concept, but the jokes were few and the action was a bit weak as well. Worth a look for any fan of the above mentioned films.




    The Perfect Host
    B-

    What you think will be a serial killer thriller with a single twist turns out to be a bit more in the third act of the film that’s light on the gore and heavy on the crazy. David Hyde Pierce stars as a schizophrenic with violent yet twisted moral tendencies; basically the dark side of Niles Crane if he snapped after one too many rainy Seattle days with Fraser.




    I’m Trying To Break Your Heart: A Film About Wilco
    C

    For years I’ve heard about how good this Wilco documentary is, and after the release of their most recent album this month I decided to finally knock it off the ol’ Netflix queue. The only other music documentary I’ve seen that I have to compare it to is Metallica’s Some Kind of Monster. One would assume that a critically lauded alternative folk/rock band would have a film with more passion, articulation, and insight than a metal rock band, but one would be wrong in such an assumption. The director of …Heart focuses more on the performances during the recording sessions of Yankee Foxtrot Hotel than the unique drama surrounding the making of the album, such as a key member being fired. Also, I’m left with no clear understanding of exactly what Wilco is as a band or who are they as individuals. There are a lot of performances though. This makes for a good musical experience for the Wilco fan, but it makes for a rather meh film.

  7. #22
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    Cool 5 "B" Movies. . .



    In Time
    B-

    Writer/Director Andrew Nichol is still tackling modern day socio-political issues in a futuristic setting. This time it’s capitalism. In Time is set in a future where everyone is genetically engineered to stop aging at 25 then you’re given one year to live unless you buy more time. And one can literally buy enough time to become immortal. The film as allegory works surprisingly well, but as entertainment it really flails. The third act plods along with little purpose and while it gives Justin Timberlake a few scenes to kickass, it really goes out with a whimper and not a bang.




    Drive
    B+

    I didn’t really appreciate this film until the second viewing. Ryan Gosling gives an excellent performance as a nameless driver that crackles with violence underneath his mostly subdued demeanor. The plot is thin and the dialogue is Spartan; however, director Nicholas Winding Refn beautifully delivers an action film with fluid pacing and some outstanding performances. Refn reminds me of Tarantino if Tarantino had cut his teeth on more arthouse than grindhouse films in his youth. The neo-80s soundtrack and sometimes languid, lingering shots may have thrown off a mainstream audience, but look a little deeper and you’ll find a diamond in the rough with this film.


    On DVD



    Friends With Benefits
    B

    It’s fun romantic comedy tailor made for Gen-Xers like myself. It plays on and tries to make light of the clichés of the genre, but it can’t help but fall into a few of those clichéd pitfalls as well—wealthy young professional urbanites, the parent with Alzheimer’s that’s conveniently forgetful (and has a sense of humor about it!), the cute, eccentric nephew.



    Matewan
    B+

    With all the Occupy Wall Street protests going on this film was recommended to me, and I’m glad I finally got around to seeing it. It focuses on the start of a coal miner’s union in West Virginia in the 1920s. Chris Cooper and James Earl Jones give outstanding performances. Unfortunately, the ending was a bit lacking.



    Winnebago Man
    B-

    This documentary is an interesting look into the life of viral videos that make unwitting (and often unwilling) stars of people. The focus is on the godfather of them all, Jack Rebney aka The Winnebago Man. Rebney is a loquacious, angry recluse and one interesting dude. The doc is rather disappointing in how one dimensional a portrait it paints of him though.

  8. #23
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    4 rental slices



    The Change Up
    C+

    I’m not sure if this is a film I’d watch the entire way through again, but it’s one of those comedies that’s worth seeing once. It has enough truly funny scenes peppered amongst the trite themes, requisite “gross out” moments, and ridiculous plot scenarios that would warrant revisiting briefly if it came up again on TV.




    SCRE4M
    B-

    This fourth installment in the popular 90s franchise, credited by some as reinvigorating the horror genre at the box-office, is very clever and—to use a term uttered by the characters in the film—very meta. Kevin Williamson & Wes Craven essentially attempt to “reboot” the franchise they spawned before the “studio” does so. What they come up with is indeed a very witty and poignant take on modern media (as have their previous films), but what they don’t deliver is a very scary or suspenseful film—and despite all the great lines, nostalgia factor, and clever social commentary, suspense is what the audience really demands from a film like this.



    Ed Hardy: Tattoo the World
    B

    For such an iconic figure in the tattoo world, you think Ed Hardy would get a little better treatment when it comes to production value. It appears the director of this documentary about Hardy’s life and art was really put together by a friend/fan of his over the course of the last 25-30 years. It’s too bad Hardy’s story wasn’t presented in a more thorough (and professional) manner. Luckily, Hardy’s work is powerful enough, and Hardy himself is articulate and well spoken when it comes to the discussion of art, tattooing, and his place in both worlds, and these factors really make this documentary worth watching.




    The Devil’s Double
    C-

    This film has some good actors and a very interesting concept—it’s based on the real life of Latif Yahia, the reluctant body double of Saddam Huessein’s malevolent son Uday. Unfortunately, what this film doesn’t have is a cohesive narrative or any real character development. The “story” begins before Operation Desert storm and meanders from one self indulgent, violent, sadistic whim of Uday’s to the next. The narrative seems to teeter back and forth between wanting to be Scarface and a less gory SAW sequel in the first two acts to a really, really poor excuse for a spy thriller in its final act.

  9. #24
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    The Woman In Black
    C+

    Not many real frights involved, and the "mystery" of the titular woman isn't much of one. Radcliff was ok, but casting him as a widowed father seems like a bit of a stretch. Didn't this kid graduate Hogwarts last year? Overall it was moody and had some creepy moments, but not really a thriller worth theater bucks. Wait for Netflix.



    Chronicle
    A-

    Fans of Akira and Unbreakable will notice some similarities in Chronicle, but it’s hard to pull of something original with a superhero film, especially when dealing with an origin story, but this film manages to do just that—be original. I’m not a big fan of the “found footage” gimmick (e.g. Cloverfield, The Blair Witch) either, but again, Chronicle manages to handle that aspect in a clever way that’s true to the characters and story.




    The Grey
    A-

    If you’re expecting this to be another Liam Neeson helmed pop-corn action/thriller like Taken or Unkown, you’re in for a bit of a surprise. The Grey isn’t about Liam Neeson vs. Wolves like the trailers suggest; don’t get me wrong, it’s got fantastic action scenes directed beautifully by Joe Carnahan, but the film goes much more deeper than a typical action romp. The Grey wants the audience to ask questions about life and death, mortality and survival. And the story is told in a manner that mirrors the Alaskan wilderness where it takes place—harsh, Spartan, and unforgiving. This is the kind of film that stays with you long after the credits (which you should watch to the very end) have stopped rolling.



    War Horse
    A-

    Steven Spielberg has sometimes been accused of being a master of the maudlin, and it’s true enough that this film sometimes drifts into the realm overtly sentimental, but the characters are so wonderfully likeable that you don’t really mind. You will find yourself cheering for this horse and fearing for this horse. The trench warfare of World War I is the film’s setting, but like most good war films, War Horse isn’t so much about one war as it is about war in general. And this film is as close to a perfect “family friendly” film about war as you’re likely to ever see in that it can speak to a 9-12-year old just as much as it can to an adult.


    The Artist
    A

    The one word that comes to mind when trying to describe this film is charming. This is a silent film that’s all about the death of silent films. As if the premise wasn’t off-putting enough to main-stream audiences, the leading man and lady are both new to modern American audiences. However, they are both delightful to watch, and the cast of supporting characters should be familiar enough to most modern moviegoers. While HUGO was a love letter to cinema, The Artist is a love letter to Hollywood, and more specifically the film stars and the funnily fickle relationships audiences have with them. And if you give this film a chance it will charm you.


    A Dangerous Method
    B-

    It follows the development and deterioration of the relationship between Jung (Michael Fassbender) and Freud (Viggo Mortenssen). Most of the focus is on Jung and a female Russian patient, played by Kiera Knightley in a memorable performance, whom eventually becomes a colleague and his mistress. Much like Jung’s love life, this film’s narrative struggles to find a solid foothold (especially with the ending), and anyone going into this film without at least a basic knowledge of psychoanalysis may be left wondering what’s going on during more than one scene.


    The Descendants
    B+

    The loss of a parent is a traumatic scenario but not one unfamiliar to the world of film—every third Disney films seemingly deals with it. However, this film puts a twist on the situation by taking it from the perspective of the spouse rather than the children. George Clooney delivers a great performance as a man confronting the loss of his wife (in more ways than one) and the sweeping changes the loss will make to his life.



    Warrior
    B

    It's the male equivalent of a chick flick, which is probably why it did so poorly at the box office. Male audience members don't usually like emotionality mixed in w/ their MMA fighting and women probably (?) didn’t understand why everyone had to beat the crap out of each other for it to be a happy ending. Not as good of a story as last year's The Fighter, but some great performances by Tom Hardy and Nick Nolte (which got an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor) and some brutal fights. This one is definitely worth watching, just have a few tissues handy.
    Last edited by Crispy; 07-08-2012 at 02:33 PM. Reason: pic links died. @_@

  10. #25
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Not a mini-review, but it's been a few months since I've done an update, so I'm owed a bit of slack for the forthcoming verbosity...



    Beasts of the Southern Wild
    A


    A good film is a confluence of many variables. A good director orchestrates these variables into a finished form. Beasts of the Southern Wild is such a film and Behn Zeitlin is such a director. And the brilliance of Zeitlin is that he manages to take all manner of seemingly contradictory elements and make them,as a nameless boat captain says in the film, cohesive.

    One such variable is story. Hushpuppy is a six-year-old girl who lives with her father on the wrong side of a levee in a fictitious Southeast Louisiana town called The Bathtub. The film follows her point of view, and the world of her active imagination and the real world around her often intertwine on screen. The film is your standard coming of age story, but it is this unique perspective of Hushpuppy and her understanding of the world around her that is the foundation of the film and its magic.

    Another variable is music. The director worked closely with his friend and composer Dan Romer in creating the score for the film. The result is one of the best scores in modern cinema. Just like the film, the music is a beautiful blend of contradictions. It's uplifting yet tinged with sadness, vast yet intimate, wise and noble yet naive and playful.

    And the final variable I'll mention is performance. Other reviewers have made mention of the non-actors that occupy this film. This is another example of the director taking the contradictory and making it cohesive. It would seem unlikely that those untrained in the craft of acting would be able to aptly portray such subtlety, humor, love and pathos yet there it is on film for all to see.

    Beasts of the Southern Wild is a film that will simultaneously break, mend, and uplift your heart. Do your soul a favor and see this film.
    Last edited by Crispy; 07-10-2012 at 08:31 AM.

  11. #26
    Senior Member holdenglass's Avatar
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    ^I was excited about seeing this and your review makes it seem worth more than excitement. This sounds like a rare movie that has the heart of a small first film but the epicness of a movie that stands the test of time.

  12. #27
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    It's in limited release, holden, so I hope you're actually able to catch it in a theater. It's the rare indie-film that definitely has some great visuals you want to see on a bigger screen.

  13. #28
    Senior Member holdenglass's Avatar
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    it opens this Friday here, whoo!

  14. #29
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    Cool Six slices on video/Netflix



    Darkon
    B

    This is a fairly well shot and edited documentary takes a fair and serious look at LARPers (Live Action Role Players, their real lives, and their motivations for putting so much devotion into Darkon, the name this Maryland LARP community gave their “world.” Intertwined with these individual portraits is the unfolding story of the Darkon, um, “realm.” At the center of this tale is a King of Kong like focus on two warring factions. One faction, led by a stay-at-home dad, unites the other nations to rise in battle against Darkon’s only superpower. I won’t lie, there are some genuine cringe-worthy moments (mostly those pre-battle ceremonies). Yet by the film’s final battle, I actually found myself caring enough about the real people behind the fictional armies that I was genuinely invested in the outcome. No small feat for those of us raised on films and TV with flawless special effects and $100 million budgets.



    The Sitter
    C

    Jonah Hill plays a slacker college dropout who has one wild night out while babysitting where all involved learn a valuable life lesson. Yes, this was already a movie in the 80s called Adventures In Babysitting. No, it’s not a remake; however, the director has some weird obsession with the 80s and likes throwing in random anachronistic 80s gags. The only real joy in this movie comes from seeing Hill say things to the faces of bratty, privileged suburbanite kids we all wish we could say. The rest of the film is either too clichéd or too bizarre to be funny.




    Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark
    D+

    You know those horror movies where you scream at the screen because the characters behave in a ridiculously idiotic way, which only serves to further the plot to its obvious conclusion? Yeah, this is one of those movies except it’s not really that scary. Although, it does get points for having truly unique, creepy, cool looking sets and antagonists.




    Project X
    C

    Every generation has their “party” movie: Animal House, House Party, seemingly one out of every five movies made in the 80s. And this one is for the dubstep/iPad generation. Not being of that generation and having seen many of Project X’s predecessors (including the much more awesome Mathew Broderick/Helen Hunt film of the same name), I was left feeling less than impressed by this film. However, there were some funny moments and a non-stop killer soundtrack.




    Little Fockers
    C

    Most of the conflict comes from rehashing old stuff from the original Focker films. However, this latest installment has a few bright spots, such as Jessica Alba in bra & panties, and a few good one liners—mostly from Owen Wilson’s pretentious, granola, millionaire investment banker character and Laura Dern’s all too brief cameo as a principal of an elitist kindergarten.



    Get the Gringo
    C

    Mel Gibson phones in a performance as a not-so-bad criminal stuck in a unique kind of Mexican prison. The script, co-written by Gibson, isn’t terrible (the premise of the prison is pretty interesting) yet it’s not as clever as it strives to be. It also suffers from some truly uninspired directing.

    Quote Originally Posted by holdenglass View Post
    it opens this Friday here, whoo!
    Excellent! Please be sure to report back after you see it.

  15. #30
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    Cool


    The Watch
    C+

    If you put Vince Vaughn, Ben Stiller and Jonah Hill in something it’s going to make me laugh. Throw in Richard Ayode from the UK series The IT Crowd, and I’m sold on the cast alone. Make the premise a neighborhood watch uncovers an alien invasion and now you’ve really got this fanboy excited. However, The Watch suffered from uneven pacing, an uninteresting subplot, a cast that seemed uncharacteristically muted throughout the film and whose best scenes suffered from the marketing curse of being spoiled in the trailer. The Watch isn’t a bad film, just one that doesn’t meet its potential.



    TED
    B+

    Fans of the TV show Family Guy or of the 1980s film Flash Gordon should love Seth McFarlane’s directorial debut, Ted. It plays like an R-rated episode of the TV show only with fewer non-sequiturs and more of an actual plot.



    Brave
    B

    It centers on a rebellious Scottish princess with a unique head of hair (requisite for all Disney Princesses) and the conflict she has with her mother. Brave has comedy, magic, animal companions, and a fierce battle with a terrible monster of legend. The only two things separating this from your standard Disney flick is the lack of musical numbers and the fact this Disney Princess has no prince; she rescues herself, mostly. If this were a Disney film I might even be impressed, but it’s a Pixar film. Pixar has produced some world’s best films (Not animated films, but films. Period.) over the past 13 years, and Brave delivers on beautiful animation and requisite Disney tropes, but it does not deliver a story or characters on par with their work in Finding Nemo, Up, Wall-E, or the Toy Story films.



    Men in Black 3
    B

    MIB 3 has the same quirky sense of humor and slightly off kilter tone as its predecessors. The downside to that tonal familiarity is at times the movie can leave you with a “been there, done that” feeling teetering on boredom. Also, I found the ending was a bit lacking for such a big build up. However, if you’re a sucker for time travel/fish out of water stories like I am or if you enjoy the Agent J/Agent K dynamic as much as I do then you probably won’t mind the film’s faults because the rest of the movie is to fun not to enjoy.



    Snow White & the Huntsman
    B

    Director Rupert Sanders was going for a LOTR feel and managed to get the pacing, costumes, sets, and cinematography down nearly perfect; although he tried to crib a bit too much from the Peter Jackson handbook in some places–solemn singing scenes and montages of characters walking in particular. It also doesn’t help when the titular character is played by least charismatic person on the screen. Charlize Theron, however, is fantastic as the evil queen, and the dwarves were great and left me wishing they’d had more screen time.

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