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Thread: The International Politics Thread

  1. #1
    A Midspring's Nightmare Rabih's Avatar
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    Angry The International Politics Thread

    I can't believe there is no topic for International Politics.
    From the jasmine revolution in Tunisia (and the ousting of Ben Ali), the Hariri vs Hezbollah in Lebanon, Berlusconi's Rubygate, Ivory Coast's unrest, Iran meets the North Korean nuclear program... Come have it all here!

    I will start on a bright note with this photo from Tunisia

  2. #2
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    Looks like the events in Tunisia have sparked a copycat movement in Algeria:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12258449
    Algerian police have broken up an anti-government demonstration by about 300 people in the centre of the capital, Algiers, calling for greater freedoms.

    Several protesters were injured and a number are reported to have been arrested. Seven police officers were also hurt, according to state media.

    The leader of the opposition Rally for Culture and Democracy (RCD) said those held included its parliamentary leader.

    The protest followed rioting in several cities set off by rising food prices.

    The government has noted the popular unrest in neighbouring Tunisia, which led to the ousting of President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali.

    Protests in Algeria earlier this month left at least five people dead

    There have also been a number of public suicide attempts, echoing the self-immolation of a man in Tunisia that triggered the protests there.

    Demonstrations are banned in Algeria because of a state of emergency in place since 1992, and the government had warned people not to attend the demonstration called by the RCD in central Algiers.

    "Citizens are asked to show wisdom and vigilance and not respond to possible provocation aimed at disturbing their tranquillity, peace of mind and serenity," it said a statement published by state media.

    Hundreds of protesters - some draped in Tunisian flags - nevertheless gathered outside the party's headquarters to march to 1 May Square, chanting "A free and democratic Algeria" and "The authorities are assassins".
    All power to them.

  3. #3
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    Russia go BOOM. Again.

    Horrendous. Makes me thankful that the recent s-bombers here in western Europe have been mostly hopeless amateurs.

    Moscow's Domodedovo airport has been rocked by a bomb explosion that an airport spokesman says has killed 35 people.

    More than 100 people were injured - 20 of them critically - by the blast, which reports suggest was the work of a suicide bomber.

    Russia's chief investigator said terrorists were behind the attack.

    The airport - the busiest serving Russia's capital - is 40km (25 miles) south-east of the city centre.

    President Dmitry Medvedev vowed those behind the attack would be tracked down.

    He ordered increased security across Russia's capital, its airports and other transport hubs, and called an emergency meeting with top officials. He also postponed his planned departure for this week's World Economic Forum at Davos.

  4. #4
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    Annnd now Egypt's at it.

    In Cairo's Tahrir Square, demonstrators attacked a police water cannon vehicle, opening the driver's door and ordering the man out of the vehicle.

    Officers beat back protesters with batons as they tried to break the police cordons to join the main demonstration, it added.


    Protesters alluded to the Tunisian uprising - this one using the French word "degage", meaning "out" One protester, 43-year-old lawyer Tareq el-Shabasi, told AP: "I came here today willing to die, I have nothing to fear."

    The AFP news agency reported that protesters had gathered outside the Supreme Court holding large signs that read: "Tunisia is the solution."

    They then broke through lines of police and began to march through the streets, chanting: "Down with Mubarak."

    Some chants referred to Mr Mubarak's son Gamal, who some analysts believe is being groomed as his father's successor. "Gamal, tell your father Egyptians hate you," they shouted.

    The organisers rallied support saying the protest would focus on torture, poverty, corruption and unemployment, calling it "the beginning of the end".

    "It is the end of silence, acquiescence and submission to what is happening in our country," they said in comments carried by Reuters news agency.
    Twitter blocked, mobile networks down. Sound familiar?

    Iran hangs election protestors

    Iran has executed two activists who took part in street protests in the wake of the 2009 presidential election result.

    Jafar Kazemi and Mohammed Ali Hajaghaei were members of the exiled opposition group, the People’s Mojahedin Organisation of Iran (PMOI).

    The PMOI has recently been taken off the EU’s list of terrorist organisations although it remains on the United States’ terrorism list. Despite this Washington had called for the prisoners’ release.

    The two men were involved in street protests that followed the disputed election victory of President Mahmoud Ahmedinejad.

    Iran’s prosecutor’s office said “these two hypocrites were members of an active network of the said group and were involved in the (post election) riots under the guidance of their ringleader in England.

    “The convicts had resorted to distributing pictures and banners related to the Monafeghins (hypocrites), taking photos and films of the clashes as well as chanting slogans in favour of the group.”

    They are thought to be the first of the election protesters to be executed. Around a dozen people have been sentenced to death for involvement in the unrest.

    Iranian authorities are said to be increasing the number of judicial killings. Citing official sources, the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran
    claims that 97 people have been executed in the past 30 days, most of them for drugs offences.


  5. #5
    A Midspring's Nightmare Rabih's Avatar
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    ^ I could try to be the Arab specialist here
    But today was MAJOR in Lebanon, Tunisia and Egypt.
    This part of the world is not looking like it will be changing any time soon.

    For Tunisia, there were pro-Ben Ali protests. Like WHAT? That ass got kicked out and you protest to get him back. The situation is still unstable, there is a lot to do and it would need years to reach a certain stability, IMO.

    In Egypt, this is the biggest protest in the recent years against Emperor Mubarak. Twitter got blocked as Helen said, and it looks like another Tunisia, yet here, the population is 70 millions and the country's huge. And this is the first protest and it took place in Cairo, whereas there, it happened gradually from city to city until reaching the capital Tunis. Let's see how today's events will shake the course of things there, but Mubarak doesn't look like he would be stepping down anytime soon.

    As to Lebanon, well, that's a hopeless case, I won't bother.

  6. #6
    werewolves, not swear-wolves Chalk's Avatar
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    Well, the new interim government in TUnisia isn't exactly a change. They are all [former] ministers from Ben-Ali's regime, and started by banning a network channel.

  7. #7
    The New Classic marci's Avatar
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    Ex-leader's Tunisian family 'not welcome in Canada'

    Relatives of Tunisia's ousted president, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, have arrived in Canada, a government official in Ottawa said Saturday.

    However, the federal government quickly made it clear that "deposed members of the former Tunisian regime and their immediate families are not welcome in Canada."

    One of Mr. Ben Ali's many brothers-in-law arrived in Montreal on Friday morning aboard a private jet accompanied by his wife, their children and a governess, the official said.

    Mr. Ben Ali's wife, Leila Trabelsi, has several brothers, but it was unclear which one had arrived in Canada.

    Citizenship and Immigration Department spokesman Douglas Kellam said in an email that Tunisians need visas to enter Canada, and that visas are only issued to people who are expected to return to their home countries.

    "Given that members of the regime cannot return to Tunisia, that would be a challenge," he said. "Mr. Ben Ali, deposed members of the former Tunisian regime and their immediate families are not welcome in Canada."

    Mr. Kellam added that "appropriate action" would be taken if it is found someone not wanted in Canada has managed to get here.

    Members of Mr. Ben Ali's family have reportedly checked into a hotel in Montreal.

    A spokesman for a Montreal-based group formed to support Tunisians who have risen up against the Ben Ali government said he was dismayed to hear that Canada had allowed his relatives into the country.

    "We're very disappointed that Canada has accepted these people who are directly related to the dictatorship and to the family that has been ruling Tunisia for the past 23 years," said Haroun Bouazzi, of the Collectif de solidarite au Canada avec les luttes sociales en Tunisie.

    Mr. Bouazzi was born and raised in Tunisia, but has been living in Canada for the past 11 years. He said the Canadian government should have refused entry to Mr. Ben Ali's family, even if they were carrying the proper documentation.

    "When Ben Ali left Tunisia, he was still president, and countries like Malta and France didn't accept him even then," Mr. Bouazzi said. "Countries always have a choice to be on the side of the Tunisian people."

    Mr. Ben Ali fled to Saudi Arabia this month after weeks of violent protests against his iron-fisted 23-year rule.

    The protests were in part fuelled by widespread allegations of corruption and reports that Mr. Ben Ali's family, particularly his wife's relatives, had gorged themselves on state funds at a time of economic hardship.

    The deposed president's daughter, Nesrine Ben Ali, and her husband, businessman Sakher El Materi, purchased a US$2.5-million home in the upscale Westmount neighbourhood of Montreal two years ago. The house is currently uninhabited and partially under construction.

    On Thursday, Tunisian authorities arrested 33 members of Mr. Ben Ali's family who were under investigation for plundering the nation's resources. The European Union has agreed in principle to freeze the assets of Mr. Ben Ali and his family, though the final details were still to be worked out.

    Agence France-Presse and Postmedia News

    Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/news/can...#ixzz1C5ZZhfSx
    Is it just me or is the Canadian incredibly stupid? Of course, I have my own reasons being an American living in Canada - but... if someone is not welcome in your country, why the hell would you let them enter in the first place? They sure as hell aren't going to want to return to Tunisia.

  8. #8
    A Midspring's Nightmare Rabih's Avatar
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    Interpol has officially been asked by the Tunisian authorities to capture Ben Ali! And his wife's tribe! Yay!
    And it looks like Egypt's dinosaur will soon follow!


    Read:
    Mubarak (right): You were the first and we are next in line
    Ben Ali: Don't be too late big bro, you know how harsh loneliness could be

  9. #9
    The New Classic marci's Avatar
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    Oh fuck!


  10. #10
    A Midspring's Nightmare Rabih's Avatar
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    ^ Yes I know. This has been the first serious internet shut down ever (Burma and Iran previously banned several sites on a temporary period of time but did not put the whole thing down).
    I hope this shithead Mubarak leaves soon. Look, they even have his boarding pass ready for Jeddah!

  11. #11
    The New Classic marci's Avatar
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    I knew of the shutdown, but having the graph really helps you understand how serious it is. I wonder how the press will be able to get around the internet shutdown. World phone? I'm clueless.

    That pic is hilarious!

  12. #12
    A Midspring's Nightmare Rabih's Avatar
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    When there is a will, there is a way. Many are communicating via satellites and the news are still being disseminated through international journalists who still have a limited access.

    The bastard now has imposed a curfew from 6 PM until 7 AM in three major cities including Cairo so that he can think properly what to do and not be disturbed.

    In the meantime, Yemen's protests are RAGING and Jordan has just seen its first protests today.

    Talk about a fully-blown change in the scene of the Arab World! And it doesn't look like it will stop soon.

  13. #13
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    There is some BGP related detail about the blackout here.

    Different media are reporting that Internet and other forms of electronic communications are being disrupted in Egypt. Presumably after a government order in response to the protests. Looking at BGP data we can confirm that according to our analysis 88% of the Egyptian Internet has fallen of the Internet. In this post Ill share some observations I made with regards to the reachability of Egyptian networks and providers.

    Whats different in this case as compared to other similar cases is that all of the major ISPs seem to be almost completely offline. Whereas in other cases, social media sites such as facebook and twitter were typically blocked. In this case the government seems to be taking a shotgun approach by ordering ISPs to stop routing all networks.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  14. #14
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    I didn't know it had kicked off in Yemen and Jordan too. Blimey. Things fall apart! The centre cannot hold! Well, that's probably an exaggeration but this wave of action spreading like wildfire reminds me of the 89-91 period in Europe, with the then eastern bloc nations' peoples successively taking to the streets to force change and regimes, nay, entuire political systems going down almost overnight. Once the idea that change is actually possible takes hold, it gets interesting, fast.

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    Join The Resistance Barbarella's Avatar
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