Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst ... 7151617
Results 241 to 250 of 250

Thread: Skincare Q & A

  1. #241
    Oy With The Poodles Already!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,047
    I need help.

    I've been lucky to have gotten away with just washing my face with regular cleanser ( St Ives Apricot Scrub) and having good skin. However, I've noticed lately that my cheeks are getting really dry lately. I know my skin is changing since I've turned 40 so I think I need to start using a moisturizer in addition to my face wash. Do any of you have any suggestions?

  2. #242
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    4,630
    Someone here recommended Solvere to me, and it's lovely. I also like the face cream from First Aid Beauty. Or there's always aloe, which I tend to use as a face moisturizer (or all over moisturizer) in the summer.

    I'd actually suggest using something a bit more gentle than the St. Ives Apricot Scrub to wash the face, but I have fairly delicate, thin skin. That stuff absolutely tears it up.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  3. #243
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Grim North
    Posts
    6,235
    Eucerin moisturizers are decent. Then there's Cetaphil.

    I will join the chorus of 'put the scrub cleanser away now'. Facial skin s delicate, thins with age and really doesn't need to be scrubbed every day - the dry skin can be the result of a normal skin's natural protective barrier becoming slowly compromised over time. The skin on your cheeks is thinnest apart from that around your eyes so it's no surprise that it's the first to dry out. I'd switch to something bland and gentle such as Cetaphil cleanser or a very gentle cleansing bar and see how things proceed. If you insist on exfoliating, do it no more than once a week. There seems to be a American skincare culture of attacking skin with harsh everything and it only leads to more issues in the long run. The best thing you can do for dry delicate skin is leave it alone as much as possible, use gentle cleansers and basic moisturizers and wear a sunscreen everyday if you can find one you can tolerate. Exfoliate with something gentle like a washcloth rather than a scrub with sharp particles in it.

  4. #244
    Oy With The Poodles Already!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,047
    Thank you everyone. I will look into the moisturizers you've all recommended. I love my st gives, but hearing this is definitely giving me second thoughts about continuing to use it.

  5. #245
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Grim North
    Posts
    6,235
    Avene Extremely Gentle Cleanser is great too - btw. I am prone to SD, although it's been no bother for a while now due to meticulous skincare and treatment. Anyway, I used to use it years ago before my skintype and problems (oily but dehydrated/atopic/SD-prone/rosacea) were properly diagnosed and it was the only thing that didn't sting or irritate when my rosacea/SD etc was bad. I've been using it mornings only this winter as my skin has been dryer and more irritable on the surface due to the cold, stripping winds and less humidity in the air. Seems to have kept it in check nicely. It's not a make-up remover though - I used L'Oreal Skin Perfection Micellar Water in the evening to remove my make-up followed by a wash with a mild goat's milk soap and water. Currently I'm trying out a Japanese Hyaluronic acid toner-type treatment before adding my very basic moisturizer on top. The Hyaluronic Acid is supposed to lock water into your skin before you add the final sealant of mosturizer on top. Seems to be working nicely.

    Does Cerave have Nicotinamide in it? I've noticed most of these newer products with 'actives' fuck up my skin good style. Nicotinamde flares my roscea and SD too. Let's not even talk about what topical Vitamin C does. Triggered nothing but angry, red, peeling, flaking, itching, raw, dry, rosacea and eczema. That was after just two applications. Total fail. Felt like putting battery acid on my skin. No idea why I tried it anyway beyond some vague 'anti-aging' idea because I don't have sun damage or many lines or anything. Took a couple of months to get my skin back in shape after that tomfoolery!

    I'll just throw this in here because it's a skincare thread and why not - the best product I've tried on my skin lately has to be La Roche Posay's Anthelios XL Smooth Lotion 50+ facial sunscreeen. Absolute winner on my skintype. My dermatologists have always said to wear a daily high protection sunscreen all year round but it's always been diffiult to find one that didn't flare a condtion or look dreadful with or without make-up on top. Avene made one I loved a few years then changed the formula so I couldn't tolerate it on my skin. The above product scores on both counts. Seems to settle my skin and works beautifully, almost like a primer, with make-up. It has some of the highest UVA protection you can get on top of high UVB protection and I can see the results - much less diffuse redness from roasacea and generally better and paler and less reactive skin when I wear it continuously. Sometimes I wear it on my chest too, sometimes I use a different sunscreen there but anyway, it's an amazing product and has become a staple over the past 18 months.

  6. #246
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Grim North
    Posts
    6,235
    Yes - I use either the Avene spray water or just a couple of splashes of tap water after the Avene cleanser. It's water-based so this is all I need to remove the traces. Leaving residue - of cleanser/make-up or whatever on my skin is the least clever idea ever.

    Have you tried a MAP vitamin c product?
    I figure that as 80% of skin ageing is caused purely by exposure to everyday UV rays, a really good sunscreen is the only thing you really need in any anti-ageing regime. The rest is not so important unless you're trying to actually reverse the signs of skin damage. Not going to try any other Vit C products because I don't have any sun damage or real problems with skin ageing that anything topical could seriously address. I initially used it in the spirit of adventure and 'why not' at a time when my skin was basically perfect by my standards and for some reason I thought that meant I could experiment a little and become - I don't know, even more perfect. Haha. Nope. Quite the reverse. So, lesson learned. I know they work well for some people, but they probably have less reactive skin than me.

    I know people who use glycolic acid after they've scrubbed their skin off with a Clarisonic. My skin flares just thinking about exfoliating that much.
    I know, I see this shit all the time on places like MUA (this is what I was referring to with my comment about harsh skincare cultures above) - people going hell for leather on their faces with a combination of chemical and physical exfoliants, endless actives etc, layering on 5 different serums and moisturizers etc and these same people wondering why they have skin that is acting the freaked-out fool long-term or a skin acid barrier that is completely destroyed. HELLO? The long-term effects of these regimes are unknown. I personally think it's foolish for anyone with skin less than leather to be constantly dissolving/scraping off the entire top layer of skin via multiple methods to expose the younger skin that may look fresher for a while but is VERY sensitive to UVA and UVB. We evolved a top, dead layer of skin for a reason - best keep at least some of it there. Yes, you can use a sunscreen, but no sunscreen catches 100% of UV rays, many sunscreens are actually shit (and the ones in make-up are useless) and have hardly any UVA protection (esp. in the US market) and barely anyone actually applies enough to start with OR reapplies every 2 hours to ensure maximum protection anyway. When you've got no top layer of skin left ... this cannot be for the best. I do wonder what this trend for maximum brutal exfoliation combined with a slapdash approach to sun protection (I don't know a single person IRL who uses one daily and if I mention it I get looked at weirdly - most people here think sunscreen is something you only use Abroad for yer hols) will create 20 years down the road.

    The Hyaluronic acid is the Hada Labo brand from Japan: http://www.makeupalley.com/product/s...da-Labo/Toners

    I got mine from a Japanese seller on ebay, cost me about £11, I think. Huge bottle which dispenses the stuff in drops. Figure it should last more or less forever. So far I've found it good but not miraculous. Japanese skincare tends to be good and Japanese sunscreens are definitely some of the most advanced on the planet. The only problem for me tends to be the high alcohol content which helps them be cosmetically elegant but irritates my skin. But they know their shit and have maximum UVA (or PPD) coverage. People marvel over Japanese and Korean women's skin and how the women tend to look in their 20s well into their 40s and this is the simple answer - they prevent damage rather than attempt to cure it. They never tan or use sunbeds, protect their skin from everyday UV to the max using both sunscreen and parasols, gloves, hats etc and don't give a damn who knows it. I wish the UK would adopt this as opposed to the current culture of tanning and spraying skin orange. Give the LRP a try - it has a little alcohol but not enough to upset my skin and we seem to have sensitivities in common. It's not expensive (at least compared to high-end counter stuff which is much less effective as well) ether. Think I paid around £14 for my last tube and because I only use it on my face and neck and sometimes chest, a tube lasts me a long time.

  7. #247
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Grim North
    Posts
    6,235
    Owls, sent you a PM. Check your box!

    I know about irritating filters - spent years not being able to use most sunscreens because they'd have SOMETHING in them which caused burning or a rash. So my sunscreen was mostly staying indoors or in the shade. Bought a sunscreen in Germany a couple of years ago that seemed fine, then one day I applied it to my arms when out walking and the sweat and heat did something to cause it to give me a measles-like rash all over! Seriously, LRP is like a holy grail in this respect to me. I also like Australian products - they deal with serious sun and skin cancer problems over there and have strict regulations about sunscreen formulations and claims. The SunSense products are good in my experience.

  8. #248
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    4,630
    I love La Roche Posay. Since an Ulta opened relatively nearby I've been trying out a few products from them, and have loved every single one. I'm pretty sure I've seen that sunscreen in drugstores here during the summer, but haven't checked to see whether they carry it year-round. Will definitely pick it up the next time I see it, it's so hard to find anything higher than SPF 30 around here, and I routinely try to use 50 to 70.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  9. #249
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Grim North
    Posts
    6,235
    I found this pdf incredibly useful when researching sunscreens, btw:

    http://www.personal-care.basf.com/do...lters-used.pdf

  10. #250
    unlikable female protagonist Sansa Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    indoors
    Posts
    596
    Oh hi, 30s, thanks for the fucking blackheads on my nose.

    HALP!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •