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Thread: The entertainment industry's unstoppable bullshit machine

  1. #16
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    ^That is exactly the same intimidation scam as the UK-based ACS: Law were running until they were effectively shut down last year by Anonymous hacking into their computers to reveal they kept their data unencrypted and more or less unprotected in violation of the Data Protection Act. It also put the companies who had been handing over the data - including BT - in a compromising position.

    ACS:Law was conducting a widespread speculative invoicing campaign, which saw Mr Crossley send letters to thousands of people accusing them of downloading content without paying for it and asking them to pay a fine of around 500 per infringement.

    The scheme came unstuck when a handful of the cases went to court and the judge ruled that the Mr Crossley had mishandled them and abused the court system.

    He faces a disciplinary hearing at the Solicitors Regulation Authority next month.
    Andrew Crossley, the slimy piece of solictor shite who ran ACS, was fined a mere 1000 for breaches of the Data Protection Act. If ACS had still been trading he could have been fined up to 200K. Of course, he claims poverty now. A consumer watchdog spokeman was unimpressed:

    "ACS Law demanded around 400 from each of the people it accused of illegal file sharing, yet for a serious breach of data protection law, it gets a paltry fine of 1,000. This is utterly inadequate - the ICO should have imposed an appropriate sanction," said Deborah Prince, head of legal affairs.

    "The ICO said that if ACS Law was still trading it would have imposed a penalty of 200,000. This beggars belief. It sends the message that businesses that commit a data breach can expect appropriate punishment, unless they dissolve their business, in which case they'll get off lightly," she added.
    Apparently Crossley worked on behalf of specific producers of content - including certain European porn producers - who got a cut of the money every time someone was intimidated into handing over 500. This led to suspicions that the same porn producers were actually seeding the torrents with their own product to ensure a steady flow of money. I don't doubt that myself. It was a scam from start to finish and should never have been allowed to operate.

  2. #17
    authentic hotdog cart vendor Frangipani's Avatar
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    In an interview, he [Steele] said anyone who fails to secure their Wi-Fi is as responsible for the subsequent crimes or tragedies as a parent who leaves a loaded gun within the reach of a 3-year-old.
    Right. Stealing some $2 porns is the same exact thing as kids murdering motherfuckers on accident. I'm so glad I get to see the decline of the industry. They were so used to making soooo much money, and god the music offered was such shit.
    Slippin' on my red dress, putting on my make-up

  3. #18
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    http://www.celebgossip.com/2011/11/r...2012-cds-13998

    no more CDs will be made starting in 2012?

    I can't find official articles on this only rumor-esque type of results are popping up on google.

    but this is kind of sad. while I love the convenience of the digital world, cloud services could be huge cunts to consumers, by charging fees, crashing, not being easily accessible in wi-fi-less areas, etc. I feel like apple and others are withholding adding more GB of storage space to their devices so they force us to use these services instead in the long run. I can just imagine unskipable advertisements popping up while I'm listening to my own music library. "your music will continue in a moment"

    this is just gonna kill the rest of the record stores remaining.

    it's really depressing. that past couple of years I noticed that bookstores, newstands, record shops, basically anything that I consider being an interesting place to shop has gone under. there will be nothing but dunkin donuts, pizza shops and hair salons left over here. (I need to move)

    (If I sound extra bitchy it's cause I have a canker sore on my tongue)


    but it does say that limited edition CDs could remain giving the artist and labels room to do it right, so who knows...
    Last edited by pan; 11-05-2011 at 01:02 AM.

  4. #19
    I'm pretty sure he said "Killdren". Stone's Avatar
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    ^ I've been reading about that this past couple of days and, although possible, it just looks like a rumor so far. A lot of people are saying it's just a rumor. I mean, you can't give a download for xmas, right? Even a pre-paid download card- it's just not the same. I would much rather they lower the price than disappear.

  5. #20
    Crimson Liberator Faust's Avatar
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    I think it's an inevidible passing point, unfortunately. I don't see CDs ever completely going out the window much like vinyl still exists, but I wouldnt be shocked if we are nearing the day where physical music is no longer the standard.

  6. #21
    Administrator Ryan's Avatar
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    They better start working on incorporating lossless formats if that's the case. I don't want to always buy music in a compressed, lossy format.

    I did read a few days ago that Apple was opening up its ALAC lossless format (similar to FLAC) to make it open-source. Maybe that's why.

  7. #22
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, I remember the death of vinyl being announced by the industry too. And sure, there was a phase when nothing much came out on it. The CD was totes going to replace that shit forever and nobody would ever want such a stupid, unwieldy thing as a big vinyl disc again when they had the bright shiny new digitalized sound of the amazing, indestructable CD. That worked well. Vinyl is - unlike CDs - actually a growing market here in the UK as people realized it has a superior sound in general to overly compressed CDs and it's just a beautiful thing to have, as well as a collectible due to the limited numbers, ensuring the high resale value that most big commercial CDs totally lack.

    As long as they're sold in crappy, lossy formats and led by a company that has a boner for proprietary everything, I have no interest in digital formats as my primary format for buying music. I loathe this cloud thing - it may be useful as an addition to hard copies etc but it will suffer all the same problems as the mp3 vendors have over time - you'll wake up one day to find the company's collapsed or decided to end the service and there goes your whole collection sorry, no refunds, fuck you etc.

    What the record industry needs to understand is that music buying is now a collection of niche markets and not the single-media monolith it was back in the 70s. Some people love everything digital while some want a hard copy for everything and others still want a vinyl while some will pay out £250 for an arty boxset with extras. Culling entire formats in an attempt to recreate the days some 30 years ago when music was sold in vast numbers in one format is not going to work to revive the industry.

    Anyway, I suspect the death of the CD is somehwat overstated. Small artists make more or less nothing from iTunes and the like, which simply acts as yet another greedy, pushy middleman in an industry already infested with middlemen, taking a huge slice of the pie. I doubt small labels like say, Coldspring that actually does pretty well selling small numbers of more obscure artists in odd genres like japannoise, post-industrial, martial-industrial, drone and so on, are going to stop producing CDs (or vinyls), rather it will be the big, clueless companies with their heads in the sand and an inability to listen to their customers desires, preferring instead to tell them what they want and then wondering why sales take a permanent nosedive.

  8. #23
    What? Peter's Avatar
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    I'll say that, as someone who sells his music online, I prefer the digital model. I hate getting physical CDs made, they're obnoxiously expensive to produce, and having to keep the physical copies in stock "just in case" is a pain in the butt. I do my digital distribution through TuneCore and keep 70% of the profits. For an indie artist, that's pretty amazing.

    That said, I don't want the CD to go away because I support artists having the choice to distribute their music in whatever format they choose- be it digitally, CD, vinyl, casette tape, or wax cyllinder. We'll see, I guess.

  9. #24
    That's so Shakespearean... Canoodlefish's Avatar
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    I love CDs because they're cheaper than vinyls and are physical. Tangibility has a lot to do with why I still buy physical copies: there's something complete about an album that I can hold, with its booklet and the case, and it quietens the completist in me that I can at least pretend I own one version of an album entirely. This was before finding out about remixes, albums that might not be how a singer has envisioned it (e.g. Fiona Apple's EM), b-sides off singles (looking at you, Tori), and Björk (Biophilia whut?!?!?).
    "Never build a dungeon that you cannot get out of."

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    I would much rather they lower the price than disappear.
    I think a reformatting of standard jewel case packaging could help cut costs. I think if CDs were packaged as mini-LPs and not in plastic cases, it could reduce the weight and bulk in warehouses.

  11. #26
    proud saab owner Gale's Avatar
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    Although there are still jewel cases being used, is it just me or are there more digipaks on music shelves these days? I really despised them initially, but for one thing, digipaks do take up a lot less space on my shelf.

    And my two cents on the possible discontinuing of CDs: I know many artists, especially independent, find it easier to have their music in digital form than to spend so much in having CDs made. This year, singer Charlotte Martin released her new album in digital format, but made the CD only available in fan clubs (I guess so she could have a general idea of how many CDs to be made, rather than make a purchase in huge quantities and have them collect dust - I'm not in the music industry, I'm simply guessing that was the logic behind it).
    But there are people still out there that do not have the greatest of internet connections, making it extremely difficult to obtain music. That's one of the reasons why I still buy CDs; that, and I just love the fact of buying it in physical format, whether in store or online via Amazon and being able to open the package, study the booklet and artwork and display it on my CD shelf among all the other albums I have collected over the years. I see them all as souvenirs, and I associate each with a personal memory from a particular time in my life.
    I know, I'm being painfully nostalgic here. The point is, while I understand the convenience of music in the digital format, I think by stopping the production of compact discs would shut the door on listeners who still don't have the technology readily available to continue supporting their favorite artists. I have already seen music stores close down or downsize their music sections - anyone been to Best Buy lately? Rows and rows of CDs have since been downgraded to a tiny section between blu-Rays and refridgerators (at least at the one I've been to). Sad, very sad.

  12. #27
    Senior Member uncanny hats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleepySweet View Post
    who still don't have the technology readily available to continue supporting their favorite artists.
    There may always be CDs, until people start collecting info again on records (vinyl or wax) en masse. It sounds weird, but from an archiving and preservation perspective, the only reason there is digital anything is because of demand. CDs still lose their info, collect dust, and scratch easier than 33s and 45s. 33s and 45s aren't as durable as 78s and I've even met some people who still record on Edison cylinders because it is still the "clay tablets" of sounds for them. I've always wanted to know what Boards of Canada would sound like on an old Edison record.

    Digital information has a million problems, everything from server crashes to faulty back up to files becoming corrupted, so there will always be hard copies.

  13. #28
    proud saab owner Gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nunu View Post
    Digital information has a million problems, everything from server crashes to faulty back up to files becoming corrupted, so there will always be hard copies.
    This.

  14. #29
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    UK Record Sales 2011 - Download Sales Up 24%, CD Sales Down 13%, BPI Still Banging On About Piracy.

    Digital music sales continued to rise in the UK in 2011, but not by enough to prevent an overall decline in album sales, according to the BPI.

    The music industry body said that 26.6 million digital albums were sold, a 24% rise on the previous year.

    However, CD album sales fell by 13% to 86.2 million discs. Overall, 6% fewer albums were sold than in 2010.

    The BPI blamed the decline on piracy and accused the government of taking too long to tackle the problem.

    Digital downloads have recorded rapid growth over recent years. In 2007, only 6.2 million albums were bought as files over the internet according to The Official Charts Company.

    The year 2011's tally was more than four times that amount. Fifteen albums sold more than 100,000 digital copies, with Adele's 21 proving the most popular.

    However, shoppers still showed a preference for CDs, buying more than three times the number of albums on disc than downloads.

    The BPI said that "physical ownership" still played an important role, but said "a backdrop of chronic piracy" posed risks to the music industry.


    While piracy may be partly to blame for the drop in album sales, the data also suggests changing buying habits.

    Sales of singles rose for the fourth successive year to 177.9 million copies, versus 86.6 million in 2007.

    Digital copies accounted for 98% of the sales. Each of the top 20 singles of the year sold more than 500,000 copies.

    One industry watcher said this underlined the fact that shoppers had become more choosy.

    "People now buy the individual songs they like rather than buying the whole album because they like a single," said Philip Buxton, an independent digital media consultant.

    "So they might buy the single and then use services like Spotify and Lastfm to listen to the other tracks and are then much more selective about what they purchase.

    "The implication for the record industry is that they need to embrace this new model rather than fight it."
    Meanwhile, Roger Ebert wants to tell you why movie revenues are down. Short version: prices, shitty moviegoing experiences due to lack of proper policing of the theatres and - something I'm really glad to see a major critic recognising - a distribution model that limits choice to the same old tentpole/braindead big budget pictures,

    A couple of really interesting data points:

    Box-office tracking shows that the bright spot in 2011 was the performance of indie, foreign or documentary films. On many weekends, one or more of those titles captures first-place in per-screen average receipts. Yet most moviegoers outside large urban centers can't find those titles in their local gigantiplex. Instead, all the shopping center compounds seem to be showing the same few overhyped disappointments. Those films open with big ad campaigns, play a couple of weeks, and disappear.

    The myth that small-town moviegoers don't like "art movies" is undercut by Netflix's viewing results; the third most popular movie on Dec. 28 on Netflix was "Certified Copy," by the Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. You've heard of him? In fourth place--French director Alain Corneau's "Love Crime." In fifth, "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo"--but the subtitled Swedish version.

  15. #30
    the reichenbach hero fox in socks's Avatar
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    I love Roger Ebert. He's absolutely right.

    I rant with him.

    When you're remaking movies that are less than 5 years old (im talking to you david fincher) you shouldn't expect too much. it's lazy film making....21 jump street movie? fuck me.

    Movie "star" money grubbing is vile to me. The holiday movies...."Valentine's Day" and the more recent "new Year's Eve" is just an opportunity for shit rate "actors" to make quick money and for movie goers to get a package deal of their favorite stars---omg ASHTON!!!! That underscores ebolas quote re: movieplex choices.

    3D is 99% bullshit and a waste of money. the re-release of oldies (lion king, etc) in 3D is again, lazy.

    I post28 netflix because i can get unrated and foreign movies that remain uncensored (fuck you blockbuster and your editing) as well as not have to deal with assholes in the theatre, insane prices and sticky seats. whats not to love? i honestly think i go to the actual cinema 2-3x/yr.

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