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Thread: Let's talk about grains!

  1. #16
    she might not be so bold fullofwish's Avatar
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    I'm glad you liked it! I often interchange between chicken and vegetable stock, I usually just grab whatever is closest I also only use the mint if we have it in the garden, because buying herbs for garnish is crazyexpensive to buy by the bunch.

  2. #17
    I'm a creep I'm a weirdo
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    My mother sent me a copy of this recipe that was printed in the paper sometime last year. I had forgotten about it and ended up making a batch for the first time this afternoon:
    Quinoa Broccoli Pilaf

    I think cooking the quinoa in water/stock that is already seasoned heightened the flavor. This recipe made about 5 cups, and I calculated a 1/2-cup serving to be ~120 calories (the paper says 148 but I didn't use cheese), 4 g fat and 5 g protein.

    I had some leftover cooked (but unflavored) quinoa from another recipe that I had stuck in the fridge. Last night I heated it and then drizzled some olive oil and salt and pepper on it, and it was very tasty.

  3. #18
    she might not be so bold fullofwish's Avatar
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    Holy moly, that recipe sounds gooooooddd! I'm gonna try that this week!

  4. #19
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    The prep work takes a little while (I need to get a garlic press), but once that's done it's pretty easy -- all one pot. I think maybe some diced carrots would go well in this and may try adding them next time.

  5. #20
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    I love Quinoa too!

    Millet is another favourite of mine. It's great in chili. I'll write up a recipe when I've woken up a bit.

    I've never had Spelt in grain form but have pasta, pizza bases and cereals made from it. It has a very wholesome and earthy flavour. It is available here in health food shops like Wholefoods, Planet Organic and the larger Holland and Barret stores.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  6. #21
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    To anyone who has used red or black quinoa, is the cooking method any different? I wanted to try them but only bought a little of each since they are double the price of the white quinoa. I made the pilaf recipe again tonight using equal parts red, black and white and it took 6 or 7 extra minutes for the water to soak up. I doubled the recipe, too, so it's possible I was doing too many things at once and added too much liquid. Or maybe I had the heat turned down too low when simmering. Also, the texture seemed a little grittier than usual (maybe that's characteristic of the red/black??).

  7. #22
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    Made this tonight. I'd probably cut the lemon juice in half if I made it again, although the cumin (which I'm not sure about as a flavor here) helps to cut some of the tartness. I think I prefer something more traditional with bulghur and cukes, but I made this since I had so much quinoa. Recipe under the spoiler. Per cup is ~115 cals, 2g fat, 6g protein.
    Quinoa Tabbouleh

    I'm curious about teff (particularly the nutritional component). I couldn't find the whole grain where I usually shop but did find teff flour. I didn't buy it because a small bag was $6.50, but maybe I will if I can't find it elsewhere. It had a recipe on the bag for peanut butter cookies. I may try to see if I can find an Ethiopian market that sells the grain.

  8. #23
    fluid, affectionate, chaste, mature Mackerel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cracked polystyrene man View Post
    To anyone who has used red or black quinoa, is the cooking method any different? I wanted to try them but only bought a little of each since they are double the price of the white quinoa. I made the pilaf recipe again tonight using equal parts red, black and white and it took 6 or 7 extra minutes for the water to soak up. I doubled the recipe, too, so it's possible I was doing too many things at once and added too much liquid. Or maybe I had the heat turned down too low when simmering. Also, the texture seemed a little grittier than usual (maybe that's characteristic of the red/black??).
    in my experience they all cook at the 15 minute mark - i put in plenty of water and then drain later in a fine colander when they're cooked. yikes - twice the price of regular quinoa?! the black quinoa sounds good though.

    ooh, and i LOVE tabouleh - though I agree, the traditional recipe is hard to beat.

  9. #24
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    Finally got around to cooking up some steel cut oats tonight. They were thicker and chewier, but I didn't think they tasted any different than rolled oats (they're supposedly nuttier). Still been on the lookout for teff.

  10. #25
    fluid, affectionate, chaste, mature Mackerel's Avatar
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    Just bought this at the market:



    Black rice!! It's actually more purplish than black, and it has antioxidants found in blueberries & grapes. Looking forward to trying it out with some asian dish.

  11. #26
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    ^ It's yummy but watch out as it can stain whatever you cook it in purple.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  12. #27
    fluid, affectionate, chaste, mature Mackerel's Avatar
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    yess my mother uses it occasionally and told me the same thing. apparently the color is so strong they're considering using it for artificial colors in soda!

  13. #28
    That's so Shakespearean... Canoodlefish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carhole View Post
    Black rice!! It's actually more purplish than black, and it has antioxidants found in blueberries & grapes. Looking forward to trying it out with some asian dish.
    I know just the thing you can try:

    Glutinous Dessert



    Ingredients

    one cup of black glutinous rice
    1/2 cup of Palm Sugar (Gula Melaka)
    10 tablespoon of white sugar
    1 can of Coconut Cream
    Water

    Roast the black glutinous rice in a frying pan on high heat. By doing this, it will release the nutty aroma of the rice. When the rice is dancing in the pan, it is ready.
    Put the roasted rice into a pot, wash and rinse thoroughly.
    Fill half the pot with water, cook over high heat.
    Once the water is boiling, turn the heat down to medium and keep stirring every 15 mins or so to prevent the rice sticking to the bottom and burned. During cooking, the water will be reduced and getting thicker, add more water when it becomes too dry and continue cooking. (tips below)

    Cook until the rice is soft and mushy. (usually takes around 2 or 3 hrs at least)
    Add palm sugar, stir until dissolved.
    Add white sugar to taste, stir until dissolved.
    Once ready, remove from heat.
    Pour the porridge into a small bowl, add a few spoonful of coconut cream on top.
    Ready to serve hot, enjoy!
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  14. #29
    I'm a creep I'm a weirdo
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    In an effort to get back in shape, I'm making serious changes to my diet. This week it's been all fresh fruits and veggies and lots of grains. Today I made this Mediterranean Barley with Chickpeas and Arugula. Here's my plate:



    And yesterday I put together my own recipe and spread sauteed onions and Portobellos over black rice then added some roasted, diced tomatoes and a little parmesan:



    I'd forgotten about this:
    Quote Originally Posted by Zach View Post
    I'm curious about teff (particularly the nutritional component). I couldn't find the whole grain where I usually shop but did find teff flour. I didn't buy it because a small bag was $6.50, but maybe I will if I can't find it elsewhere. It had a recipe on the bag for peanut butter cookies. I may try to see if I can find an Ethiopian market that sells the grain.
    I finally found whole teff about a year ago and tried it. I just cooked it and poured it in a Pyrex dish to cool. It firms up into a cake, and I break off pieces to reheat and drizzle with agave nectar for breakfast.

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