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Thread: The All-Inclusive M.I.A. Thread

  1. #226
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    I plan to listen on streaming on the way to work tomorrow and pop up to the excellent independent record shop near my office at lunchtime if I like it.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  2. #227
    Senior Member xmasinspace's Avatar
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    Finally and A.M.P are among the best things she's ever done.
    Last edited by xmasinspace; 09-09-2016 at 07:00 AM.

  3. #228
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    I like the new album! They didn't have the CD in stock in my favourite shop when I popped in so I will get it another time. I did get the new De La Soul as I hate to leave a music shop empty handed.

    Interview with MIA in The Graun.

    MIA: Is the musician paranoid, or is everyone out to get her?
    spoilered for length


    Didn't we have a MIA dramz thread in scandel sheet or somewhere?

    I nearly booked for the Afropunk festival as I'd love to see her but was umming and arring as I hate the venue so am glad I didn't now. I would like to see Grace Jones who replaced her but not enough to go to Ally Pally. I hope MIA does another London date as I need to get her seen!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  4. #229
    Quote Originally Posted by Joey View Post
    I didn't enjoy this album at all. I think I only liked "Go Off" and "Freedun."
    Yeah, most of it feels limp. It's a bit too laid-back. Take MIA's vocals on Fly Pirate as an example. Could she sound any more bored or phoned in? The weirdness of Bird Song is appreciated, but musically it does nothing for me. If I were to condense this album into something palatable, I'd go with the following:

    1. Borders
    2. Go Off
    3. Finally
    4. The New International Sound (Pt. 2)
    5. Platforms
    6. Freedun

    And still, it's not like that would be an amazing EP. Though to be fair, I have never liked an MIA album all the way through. It's always a pick and choose type situation. But the pickings are slim this time around and there's nothing as fantastic as Know It Ain't Right, Exodus, It Iz What It Iz, Caps Lock or Jimmy.

  5. #230
    Senior Member AshaBlack's Avatar
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    I know it's a little soon and I cojld change my mind at a later stage but currently im feeling this album is lacking something. It almost feels as though it's not finished or like she was inspired in terms of subject matter but the tracks themselves seem forced & kind of lifeless.

    The beats sound pretty generic and flat through a lot of it (as mentioned above Fly Pirate is an example) and beats is something that MIA usually does well. I wish I could say the vocals were at least impressive but she really does sound bored and the auto tune through so much of it sounds like a lazy addition. Even the songs with interesting beats like Bird Song & Freedun sound in incomplete or flat in areas to me.

    Maybe I had high expectations because I really like Borders and I felt her hype and so this has left me feeling a bit like "is that it?" - she came across as so passionate about political and social issues during the whole lead up to this album yet the album for the most part is like she popped some valium. I hope I feel differently eventually.

  6. #231
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    Big news! MIA is curating Meltdown festival 2017
    MIA is going to be the boss of this year’s Meltdown, the prestigious music and arts festival held annually at the Southbank Centre. Since 1993, Meltdown has given one person free rein to curate multiple performances over several days. Following in the footsteps of David Bowie, Morrissey, John Peel and Jarvis Cocker, Mathangi ‘Maya’ Arulpragasam will coordinate ten days of events between June 9 and June 18 this year.

    Although the line-up is still being worked on, MIA states that she plans to ‘bring together music’s best forward thinkers, who have contributed to all our lives’. She also wishes to ‘redefine the concept of a melting pot’. Writing exclusively for Time Out about her forthcoming Meltdown, MIA reflected on the influence British culture has had on her career:
    'Growing up in Britain in the '90's as a teenager probably cemented my love for music because there was such variety and Britain was always at the forefront. Whether it was underground street dance music, to club culture, to multicultural variety to indie music. I think it was such a serious thing back then and the output and quality was amazing. It really inspired me to become the type of musician I became. It really inspired and educated my tastes.'

    We think she's a great choice to lead Meltdown in 2017. Here are five reasons why she's the perfect fit...

    1. She’s a provocateur

    At a time when seismic political decisions are making activists of many, the idea of an activist helming Meltdown makes so much sense. As early as 2005’s debut album ‘Arular’, she was proud to boast ‘I’m a fighter, a nice nice fighter.’ She has supported the rights of Tamils in Sri Lanka, was outspoken over the Iraq War, has criticised state surveillance and champions the rights of migrants. It demonstrates a career-long devotion to campaigning that Kasabian or The 1975 could never show.
    2. She’s not just another bloke from a band

    The only other women to have run Meltdown are Yoko Ono, Patti Smith and Laurie Anderson. That’s three women compared to 21 men. Seems about time things levelled out a bit. Moreover, she has a fine pedigree as a visual artist, so expect MIA’s Meltdown to be loads more arresting than most.
    3. Her rebel credentials are impeccable

    These days the famous are celebrated as being ‘kickass’ for the most trivial of nods to social issues. MIA has been kicking up a proper ruck since Y2K. Perhaps her most costly fight stemmed from her flipping the finger (to the outrage of middle America) during the 2012 Super Bowl half-time show. The NFL initially sued for $16.6 million; they settled out of court.
    4. She’s internationally minded

    Arts and music fans who are alarmed at growing insularity and nationalism around the world will take heart that Meltdown’s boss this year is someone with a truly global outlook. Her videos alone have taken fans across the Mojave Desert and into the jungles of South India, through migrant border crossings and famously along a drag strip in Morocco for ‘Bad Girls’.
    5. She has great taste

    Meltdown is all about putting together a varied programme of talent – something that’s a gift to someone like MIA who has worked with people as diverse as Madonna, Elastica, Peaches, Jay Z, Spike Jonze and Romain Gavras, among many others. She even got Julian Assange to open for her once in 2013 – via Skype. It might be hard to get him in person, but you never know...

    This is huge!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  7. #232
    Senior Member xmasinspace's Avatar
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  8. #233
    HUH! HUP! HYAAAAT! Joey's Avatar
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    Ehhh...

  9. #234
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    After fighting with the inevitable meltdown of the ticketing site when tickets for her Meltdown Festival show went on sale I managed to bag a ticket. I'm so excited as I've never seen her before!
    Last edited by beanstew; 04-06-2017 at 02:23 PM.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  10. #235
    Senior Member xmasinspace's Avatar
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  11. #236
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    There's a film of her life!

    Matangi/Maya/MIA review – combative musician shows she is director of own life
    Many years in the making, this definitive documentary on political musician MIA is credited to long-time friend Stephen Loveridge. Really it should at least be co-credited to Matangi/Maya Arulpragasam – for one thing, it’s her own footage of her early career and in Sri Lanka, where the film sources its greatest energy. More than that, she’s the controlling spirit of this enjoyable documentary: always the centre of attention, performing and setting the mood with absolute magnetism. It’s clear she’s the director of her own life and Loveridge just happens to occasionally be in the right place at the right time.

    The structure of the film is mostly linear and traditional, following MIA from early days as the child of Sri Lankans immigrant in London to present-day fame, controversy and motherhood. But there’s nothing traditional about her – she and her siblings had to be tough and reinvent themselves in the absence of a father who was away as an activist in the Tamil resistance movement. Her music, artwork, fashion and general angry-rave aesthetic appears to have come to her with little effort; she just knew it would work.
    Toughness is a recurring theme. Arulpragasam never takes an easy route, composing her own music and conceptualising her own music videos from the start: leaving a cushy situation as Justine Frischmann’s wing woman to work independently, turning up at XL Recordings to ask them to sign her, and all the ways she annoyed the US press once notorious there. Appearing on American TV heavily pregnant, declaring that there was a genocide of Tamils in Sri Lanka at awards ceremonies, and constantly avoiding ducking difficult situations.

    The film comes from a place of deep admiration for MIA, but unlike more fawning biographies, it makes a convincing case that this admiration is well earned. Many people will be unaware of the viciousness of the backlash against her by a US media establishment who attempted to portray her as a fake fashionable radical. Lynn Hirschberg of the New York Times is caught on camera gushing over her interviewee before condemning her in a lead magazine article. A terrible parody video accuses her of being a champagne socialist. Bill Maher patronises her on his chat show when she tries to explain her concerns. In an aggravating moment, a radio DJ entirely fails to comprehend the message of her ironic video for Born Free, in which red-haired men and children are hunted down and shot in the head.

    There’s a key section where Arulpragasam’s frustration with her treatment is summed up in her claim that people want brown celebrities to smile nicely like Aziz Ansari rather than have political opinions and feel like a threat. It’s in these later stages of the film, as her life becomes ever more complex, that Loveridge captures the best original material. While it’s a thrill to see her breezily workshop her tracks early in her career, including a great exploratory version of Paper Planes and a visit to see Afrikan Boy and dance with him, she remains emotionally elusive; it’s the painful times in more recent years are where we really get to know her.

    We’re backstage as she’s condemned and sued by the NFL for displaying a middle finger during the super bowl. It’s edge-of-the-seat stuff as she and her team are confused and scared by the fake gravity of the situation. Madonna is no help. Arulpragasam’s son says he doesn’t like the Super Bowl at all and he just wanted to be with his mum, and they have a cuddle. As she’s done since she was a teenager, she shrugs her shoulders, trusts her instincts, and moves on knowing she was in the right. Whilst not the most beautiful looking material, this extended sequence is pacy and well-edited and, like many set pieces in the film, proves a theory suggested almost from the first lines of the film – that this unique pop star always knew she was special and that would annoy people.

    The documentary is open-ended, with a mini-conclusion of the family moving back to the UK from the US, but this isn’t a happy ending. It seems MIA will be fighting forever, a one-woman awkward squad whose background, both economically and racially, means she’s not allowed to get too popular. It’s right that for once, in this film, she truly gets to control her own narrative.
    I'd be really interested to see that!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  12. #237
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    I'm hoping to catch it in London!

    Interview in The Guardian:

    ‘The first cut I saw, I puked’: the story of MIA’s turbulent new documentary
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  13. #238
    Senior Member xmasinspace's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by beanstew View Post


    I'm hoping to catch it in London!

    Interview in The Guardian:

    ‘The first cut I saw, I puked’: the story of MIA’s turbulent new documentary
    There was some very intimate stuff in there that really helped explain a lot of her motivations. Such a fascinating backstory she has. Loved it. Seeing it again tonight.

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