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Thread: Buy my kids presents!

  1. #16
    A Matter Of How You See It Kala's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Churumbela View Post
    The entire email seemed to make little to no sense, or at the very least contradicted itself. "I hate that Xmas is so commercial! My kid needs a special present! WAAAAAAAH!" What is that hoping to accomplish?
    I think it's a misguided attempt to manipulate the reader into thinking that this person really despises the over-commercialization of the holiday. And because of the resulting hype, his child will "notice" if he doesn't get anything "special." Therefore, X-Mas really sucks, but it's not his fault, so could EVERYONE just pitch in and help the kid!

  2. #17
    authentic hotdog cart vendor Frangipani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kala View Post
    I think it's a misguided attempt to manipulate the reader into thinking that this person really despises the over-commercialization of the holiday. And because of the resulting hype, his child will "notice" if he doesn't get anything "special." Therefore, X-Mas really sucks, but it's not his fault, so could EVERYONE just pitch in and help the kid!
    Or he could like...A) teach his son what christmas is REALLY about (jesus) B) not celebrate christmas to begin with? C) do anything but what he did
    Slippin' on my red dress, putting on my make-up

  3. #18
    A Matter Of How You See It Kala's Avatar
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    Which reminds me, I was browsing yesterday through a small specialty shop, and this kid repeatedly shouted at his father "SINCE IT'S ONLY $20 DOLLARS, ARE YOU GOING TO BUY IT FOR ME?" It's a quite little place and the child could be heard throughout the entire store. You could see some patrons staring at the father (who appeared very sheepish) in disbelief. I was both embarrassed for and disgusted by him.

  4. #19
    Make it Pink Medusa's Avatar
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    I know I'd ask for toys if my parents specifically said I would be allowed to pick one out, but I was always incredibly sensitive about money and never wanted to ask for expensive gifts when I was a kid.

    There have been plenty of occasions where my sister and I will be reminiscing about toys as adults and my mom or dad will say "I had no idea you wanted X, why didn't you say anything?"

    "Because you raised us not to beg for gifts constantly and be happy with what we had?"

    Even when I was a very little kid, books trumped toys every time. My Laura Ingalls Wilder book set > Snoopy Sno Cone Maker.

  5. #20
    werewolves, not swear-wolves Chalk's Avatar
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    I had this very conversation with an acquaintance the other day about this. She is a single mother of wo toddlers and with little income. I told her about my childhood and that my mum couldn't afford to give us things. That we did get presents from my grandparents or other relatives and not always toys but clothes. And that a couple of those clothes I still have it, stored but I bring myself to give it away because I guess it means a lot to me still.

    I told her that if you explain to your kids that you don't have the money they'll understand. I think my mother must have said it to me because I never begged for toys when I was a kid. I understood from a very young age that my mum couldn't afford it, and I don't think I ever made a fuss about it. I remember going on toy stores at the LEGO displays and daydream of which one I'd buy if I could. The pirate ship in particular was a favourite. Still, I don't feel like I missed anything. I had some LEGO, not the pirate ship but me and my siblings could spend a day building, fighting and then building some more and then take it apart ad start again another time. That is one of my fondest memories.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard Mickey Wrangle View Post
    Even when I was a very little kid, books trumped toys every time. My Laura Ingalls Wilder book set > Snoopy Sno Cone Maker.
    ^^Even though I loved to read when I was a kid, I wasn't very literary. What I loved, and what fascinated me was reading encyclopedias, geography books and for my 9th birthday I was given a book of greek myths that I could recite by heart, oh! and dinosaurs. Wanted to know everything about dinosaurs. I swear I wasn't that nerdy then (much later though), as I spent most of my time playing outside.

  6. #21
    she might not be so bold fullofwish's Avatar
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    It is really interesting reading about everyone's experiences and memories of receiving gifts as children. My sister and I always received a number of gifts for Christmas - usually a "big" one for us to share (like a big kitchen toy set or something) and a couple of individual toys each, like dolls or whatever. But we ALWAYS got books as well and they were often the highlight of our presents. Books held a reverence "back in the day" that they don't seem to hold in current generations of youngsters.

    This changed when we got to about 10 or 11. One year my mum decided she didn't want to buy gifts anymore - I don't think she liked the shopping. So, a few weeks before Christmas my parents would take us to this huge toy store in town and we were each given a $20 note ... and we could buy ANYTHING we wanted with that $20. If we wanted just one toy, that was fine - or, we could buy a bunch of little ones. But it was up to us to choose within that budget, then she took them from us and wrapped them and put them under the tree for Christmas. Then, on Christmas day that would be our main present and we'd each get a couple of books from "Santa" or maybe a computer game to share or something like that. But the point was clear - we had equal opportunity (in terms of $) and we had absolute freedom to choose what we wanted, within the confines of a budget. So while we were getting gifts I think we were also getting a message - one about budgets, and priorities (Jem doll or Lego? My Little Pony or clothes for my Cabbage Patch?) and the simple *adult* act of having to make choices that mean you sometimes miss out on something else that you want. But thats life.

  7. #22
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard Mickey Wrangle View Post
    I know I'd ask for toys if my parents specifically said I would be allowed to pick one out, but I was always incredibly sensitive about money and never wanted to ask for expensive gifts when I was a kid.

    There have been plenty of occasions where my sister and I will be reminiscing about toys as adults and my mom or dad will say "I had no idea you wanted X, why didn't you say anything?"

    "Because you raised us not to beg for gifts constantly and be happy with what we had?"
    I was similar and rarely asked for expensive toys as a child, and was mostly content with books (until I was a tween and became obsessed with Breyer horses, but I bought them with my allowance money generally). I'd always coveted a Lite Brite, which my mum found out about. She bought me one for Christmas two year ago.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  8. #23
    Militia of the Mind toriMODE's Avatar
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    Starting at age 6 or 7, I did chores around the house for a weekly allowance of $2.00. Then as I got older, it eventually became $5. Then I began doing yard work to earn money in my neighborhood. So if I wanted anything I had to buy it for myself, except for my birthday or Christmas, and even then I think gifts were under $50.00 for those occasions.

  9. #24
    Frankly my dear Girl Friday's Avatar
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    I grew up dirt poor (talking food stamps and subsidized housing poor), and same situation as Chalk, grandparents would get us clothes, and one other non essential item. And it was still special. And despite not having much, I was still happy as a pig in mud on Christmas. The best thing was no matter how poor we were, my mom would still have us donate canned food or our outgrown (and in good shape) clothes to children who needed it. I don't feel bad when my friends whine about not being able to get their kids "as much" as last year or the year before wah wah wah.

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