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Thread: Was there a history thread?

  1. #16
    Why is this happening to me? beanstew's Avatar
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    This is pretty cool:

    WWII Dornier bomber raised from English Channel
    A German World War II bomber has been raised from the bottom of the English Channel.

    The Dornier Do-17 aircraft was shot down off the Kent coast more than 70 years ago during the Battle of Britain.

    Believed to be the only intact example of its kind in the world, it has lain in 50ft (15m) of water on the Goodwin Sands.

    Attempts by the RAF Museum to salvage the relic had been hit by strong winds over the last few weeks.

    The BBC's Nick Higham on board the salvage barge said the weather conditions for the hour-long operation were "near perfect" on Monday evening.

    The salvage almost had to be postponed again when the rope from one of the salvage barge's four anchors got wrapped around its propeller, but the crew were able to free it in time to take advantage of the tidal conditions, our correspondent said.

    The aircraft was badly corroded, the fuselage twisted and held in place only by a strut inserted by the salvage team. The engines had come adrift and will not be raised until Tuesday, he added.

    The Dornier will be restored at a site in Shropshire before eventually going on display at the RAF Museum in Hendon, north London.

    Museum spokesman Ajay Srivastava said: "It has been lifted and is now safely on the barge and in one piece.

    "The operation has been an absolute success, the aircraft looks great and I believe it will be towed into port tomorrow morning."

    Originally designed as a fast reconnaissance aircraf, the Dornier had been converted by the Luftwaffe in the mid-1930s into a medium bomber.

    The aircraft was a mainstay of the German bomber fleets during the Battle of Britain in 1940. The wreck is believed to be aircraft call-sign 5K-AR, shot down on 26 August that year at the height of the battle.

    Two of the four crew members died and were buried elsewhere, and two - including the pilot - survived to become prisoners of war.

    The existence of the aircraft at Goodwin Sands became known when it was spotted by divers in 2008 lying on a chalk bed with a small debris field around it.

    Sonar scans by the RAF Museum, Wessex Archaeology and the Port of London Authority then confirmed the identity of the aircraft.

    A grant of more than £345,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund allowed the salvage project to start.

    The plan was three years in the making and involved divers attaching lifting equipment to what are believed to be the strongest parts of the Dornier's frame and raising it whole, in a single lift.

    The original plan to build an aluminium frame or cradle around the fragile wreck was abandoned after it became clear it would take too long and send the £600,000 project way over budget.

    A two-year restoration will now take place at the RAF Museum's site in Cosford, Shropshire.

    Experts plan to spray the wings and fuselage with water and a combination of citric acid and sodium hydroxide in an attempt to halt corrosion.


    Video and other media behind the link.

    I'm a bit of an aviation nerd and have been following this project since it was first in the news so am excited that they've finally managed to raise it.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  2. #17
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    The Time Napoleon Was Attacked by Rabbits

    There are a couple versions of this story. Most agree it happened in July 1807, after Napoleon signed the Treaties of Tilsit (which ended the war between the French Empire and Imperial Russia). Looking to celebrate, the emperor proposed a rabbit hunt, asking Chief of Staff Alexandre Berthier to make it happen.

    ...

    there were a lot of rabbits, and Berthier’s men caged them all along the fringes of a grassy field. When Napoleon started to prowl—accompanied by beaters and gun-bearers—the rabbits were released from their cages. The hunt was on.

    But something strange happened. The rabbits didn’t scurry in fright. Instead, they bounded toward Napoleon and his men. Hundreds of fuzzy bunnies gunned it for the world’s most powerful man.

    Napoleon’s party had a good laugh at first. But as the onslaught continued, their concern grew. The sea of long-ears was storming Napoleon quicker than revolutionaries had stormed the Bastille. The rabbits allegedly swarmed the emperor’s legs and started climbing up his jacket. Napoleon tried shooing them with his riding crop, as his men grabbed sticks and tried chasing them. The coachmen cracked their bullwhips to scare the siege. But it kept coming.

    Napoleon retreated, fleeing to his carriage. But it didn’t stop. According to historian David Chandler, “with a finer understanding of Napoleonic strategy than most of his generals, the rabbit horde divided into two wings and poured around the flanks of the party and headed for the imperial coach.” The flood of bunnies continued—some reportedly leapt into the carriage.

  3. #18
    it wouldn't even matter other pete's Avatar
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    Proper chills down the spine, reading these words published for the first time today, which were prepared for the Queen to read out on TV in 1983 as the nukes rained down across her realm (just before my 10th birthday). We're so conditioned to hearing her say the same placid things and it never being controversial...



    "But whatever terrors lie in wait for us all, the qualities that have helped to keep our freedom intact twice already during this sad century will once more be our strength."


    Keep calm and prepare for agonising death.

  4. #19
    Why is this happening to me? beanstew's Avatar
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    I took some slight comfort from knowing I'd be instantly vapourised due to living very close to an important RAF base.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  5. #20
    it wouldn't even matter other pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanstew View Post
    I took some slight comfort from knowing I'd be instantly vapourised due to living very close to an important RAF base.
    *envy*! I had sleepless nights because my parents had CND leaflets explaining that as we lived 8 miles from a city that was a likely target, we'd survive at least a couple of weeks but that survivors from the city would be likely to arrive and try to steal our food, water, and medical supplies. FML.

    My mum was a red cross volunteer with responsibility for handing out blankets to villagers whose clothes had been incinerated. The leaflet did not dwell on the further implications re the wellbeing of people whose clothes had incinerated.

    What the hell are we cosseted consumers complaining about being terrorised by these days?

  6. #21
    Why is this happening to me? beanstew's Avatar
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    Did you ever see Threads? I didn't when I was young but lots of people I know saw it when at school . I watched it a few years ago for the first time and it was very harrowing. It must have been absolutely horrifying for younger people in the 80s. One for the depressing movies thread probably.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  7. #22
    pummelled gall-nuts afloat in urine
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    That's fascinating and awful. Pretty much the surest way to deny myself a night of sleep is to watch old Protect & Survive videos.

    Threads is brutal. One children's book (for kids!) I had to read for school (for school!) was Brother in the Land which is still pretty much the most haunting thing I've ever read.

  8. #23
    Why is this happening to me? beanstew's Avatar
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    I can remember picking up When The Wind Blows by Raymond Briggs in the school library mistakingly thinking it was just a light comic book. It really isn't.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  9. #24
    Science Bitch Scottish Woman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanstew View Post
    Did you ever see Threads? I didn't when I was young but lots of people I know saw it when at school . I watched it a few years ago for the first time and it was very harrowing. It must have been absolutely horrifying for younger people in the 80s. One for the depressing movies thread probably.
    I keep meaning to mention it in the depressing movies thread, it's much better than The Day After. I sometimes tell my friends that I'm watching it "to remind myself that it could be worse." I only watched it myself a few years ago, I don't think I would've slept as a child had I seen it!

    Quote Originally Posted by beanstew View Post
    I can remember picking up When The Wind Blows by Raymond Briggs in the school library mistakingly thinking it was just a light comic book. It really isn't.
    I think my parents bought it for my brothers thinking the same thing! I remember my friend came round, picked it up, and decided we should act out the parts of Hilda and Jim (I think we were about 9 at the time.) I refused, and had a hard time trying to explain to her that it really wasn't the best book for play-acting! I'd seen the film, and while I didn't appreciate the intricacies of the plot, I understood the ending well enough.

  10. #25
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    So today is the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination. Can I just say that the grief porn associated with it here in Kennedy country is making me nuts? It might be worse for me than most of you, given I'm surrounded by Irish Catholic Democrat Massholes, but today is going to be unbearable.

    I'm not belittling his death. I do think it was a horrible thing that changed our country for the worst. But like with 9/11, honoring it and remembering it is not limited to just the anniversary itself. It's been a week-long onslaught of "alas" and "what if" stories, not to mention glurgy "Where were you" crap.

  11. #26
    fire up the quattro SMMY's Avatar
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    Yes, the coverage is on overload, but I also think it was one of those things that was like a thunderclap for people who were alive when it happened. Like 9/11, at the time it happened it was too soon to process what had happened and rationally view its place in history. Now that it is fifty years later, I think it is an appropriate time to record the events of that day and people’s stories about it (much like Studs Terkel’s “Hard Times” collection of people’s memories of the depression). So many people who were a part of that era are no longer with us. I think it is important to collect those stories, flawed though they may be, to give people who weren’t alive then, a feeling of what its impact was for them and the nation. Many of events that day will be covered with a gauzy veil of nostalgia and sorrow, but it also will allow future generations to understand the meaning of that day. It had a profound effect on the country and the direction of our politics and culture, from the local (the condemnation of the city of Dallas) to the international (the further hardening of the cold war policy).


    So fifty years from 9/11 be prepared to be engulfed in the same saturation of coverage by what ever medium is tasked with covering the event. Much of it will be tacky and manipulative, but there also will be some elements of truth in all of the hoopla. Hopefully that is what will be remembered.


    Oh and to jump on the tacky “where were you” bandwagon, I was six years old and in the first grade. Our teacher stopped class, announced that the president had been shot and that we were being sent home early. My first reaction at that moment was fear for two reasons. One, we were being sent home from school and that never happened unless you were sick or there was some sort of real emergency. The second reason was that my teacher was crying during the announcement. Up until then my understanding was that adults never cried, because they were these beings, who I thought of as invincible and kept us safe. Seeing someone who was an authority figure shaken and obviously not in control was terrifying. I remember feeling that I could no longer count on adults to keep us safe.

  12. #27
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    Spoilered for length. If WWII happened on FB newsfeed.




    "If ____ happened on Facebook" things crack me up.

  13. #28
    Why is this happening to me? beanstew's Avatar
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    This is pretty cool.

    Century-old photo negatives found in Antarctic explorer's hut
    (CNN) -- While a Russian-flagged vessel remains stuck in Antarctic ice, recently discovered photo negatives remind us this cold continent has been stopping explorers in their tracks for a century.

    New Zealand's Antarctic Heritage Trust found the negatives in an expedition hut from Capt. Robert Falcon Scott's failed 1912 quest to become the first man to reach the South Pole.

    The photos were taken during Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1917 Ross Sea Party, another failed exploration whose members were forced to live in Scott's hut after their ship blew out to sea.

    The cellulose nitrate negatives were found clumped together in a small box in the darkroom of Herbert Ponting, Scott's expedition photographer, the trust said. The trust took the negatives to New Zealand, where they were separated to reveal 22 images.
    Many images were damaged, but the trust says it was able to recognize landmarks around McMurdo Sound. It's unknown who took the photos.

    Scott was a British explorer who became famous during what historians call the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. He arrived at the South Pole in January 1912 to discover his rival, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, had beaten him to the spot by an estimated 33 days.

    Scott and several comrades died in March 1912 during the return journey.

    Several years later, Shackleton attempted the first land crossing of Antarctica from the Weddell Sea to the Ross Sea via the South Pole, according to the Museum Victoria website.

    Ten members of the group were stranded when their ship, the Aurora, blew out to sea and they were forced to live in Scott's hut. Three men died before they were rescued in 1916.

    Nigel Watson, Antarctic Heritage Trust's executive director, said the new photos are a historic treasure.

    "It's an exciting find and we are delighted to see them exposed after a century," Watson said.


    More images behind the link.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  14. #29
    it wouldn't even matter other pete's Avatar
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    Lawks! Mercy! Would you credit it!

    Man wears first top hat. London riots.


  15. #30
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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