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Thread: What's the last book you read?

  1. #1
    see a sea anemone devnull's Avatar
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    Lightbulb What's the last book you read?

    And what did you think of it?

    Last night I finished Amsterdam by Ian McEwan. Brutal, unsentimental. It was my first try of any of his novels and it sat on my bookshelf for almost two years before I got around to it. Loved his style, though I saw the plot twist coming sooner than I'd have liked. It's not realistic, but not quite surreal, either. It hasn't let go of my head all day.

  2. #2
    HUH! HUP! HYAAAAT! Joey's Avatar
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    My final novel as an undergrad was Geographies of Home by Loida Maritza Perez. Stunning book.

  3. #3
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
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    Shame by Salman Rushdie. A fun myth filled romp through modern day Pakistan. Thoroughly enjoyable and classic Rushdie.
    Last edited by Banjee; 06-15-2010 at 01:46 PM.

  4. #4
    I'm currently slogging through To The Lighthouse. Virginia could do with being a little more...economical. Brevity, please. Go easy on my puny brain.

  5. #5
    asari scientist gyabou's Avatar
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    Lately I keep starting books and taking a century to finish them. Right now I'm simultaneously reading Curtis Cate's biography of George Sand and also Sand's Indiana.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    I just finished South of Broad by Pat Conroy. He's mostly known for writing the Prince of Tides and has written a handful of long, colorful novels set in the south. This one was pretty good - I was stuck to it for a solid week until I was finished.

    I'm gonna hit the library today - any suggestions?

  7. #7
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
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    Have you read White Oleander? I read it over spring break and I was shocked by how well-written and entertaining it is. I highly recommend it.
    Last edited by Banjee; 06-15-2010 at 03:49 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member pancakefrompele's Avatar
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    I recently read "Tell All" by Chuck Palahniuk. It was pretty decent. I think I like it more as time goes by...

  9. #9
    safely on a cloud tully's Avatar
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    I just finished Pullman's The Good Man Jesus and The Scoundrel Christ, which I enjoyed immensely. Now I'm in the middle of Funny in Farsi, by Firoozeh Dumas, which is more lighthearded and amusing.
    Last edited by tully; 06-15-2010 at 02:48 PM.

  10. #10
    Lyrical acuity and mum-smarts menju56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish Custard View Post
    I'm currently slogging through To The Lighthouse. Virginia could do with being a little more...economical. Brevity, please. Go easy on my puny brain.
    Ah yes. I do actually really like To the Lighthouse but it took me quite a bit of concentration!

    Currently reading Chronicles by Bob Dylan. I think the last fiction I finished was Muriel Spark's The Driver's Seat which I adored.

  11. #11
    Senior Member pancakefrompele's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tully! View Post
    I just finished Pullman's The Good Man Jesus and The Scoundrel Christ, which I enjoyed immensely. Now I'm in the middle of Funny in Farsi, but Firoozeh Dumas, which is more lighthearded and amusing.
    I have wanted to read that for quite some time. I need to pick it up!

  12. #12
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    Proust's Swann's Way. There is virtually no plot, the sentences are long and knotted, the whole novel is uncompromisingly introspective, and it is seriously one of the best books I've ever read. READ IT!

  13. #13
    condemned to wires and hammers ebby's Avatar
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    Borrowed "The Lovely Bones" off my mother, as I'd not read it, so that's what I'm reading right now.

  14. #14
    I like cookies leirali's Avatar
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    I finished listening to Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater on audio recently and I thought it sucked. It's another YA novel trying to cash on in Twi-fail fame, only this was more like the "Team Jacob" version because it was about a romance about a teen girl and a werewolf. The writing was so-so (nothing to cringe about), but I just couldn't get past how the two main characters were thrust together and were instantly dating. I love listening to YA audiobooks at work because my job is so tedious and the story-lines are simple and quick, but this was not my cup of tea.

    I really want the new Philip Pullman book. It's in my Amazon cart right now, just waiting for me to proceed to checkout . . .

  15. #15
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    I last read The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson which was amazing. I've got The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets' Nest waiting for me when I finish Marching Powder by Rusty Young.

    MARCHING POWDER is the story of Thomas McFadden, a small-time English drug smuggler who was arrested in Bolivia and thrown inside the notorious San Pedro prison. He found himself in a bizarre world, the prison reflecting all that is wrong with South American society. Prisoners have to pay an entrance fee and buy their own cells (the alternative is to sleep outside and die of exposure), prisoners' wives and children often live inside too, high quality cocaine is manufactured and sold from the prison.

    Thomas ended up making a living by giving backpackers tours of the prison - he became a fixture on the backpacking circuit and was named in the Lonely Planet guide to Bolivia. When he was told that for a bribe of $5000 his sentence could be overturned, it was the many backpackers who'd passed through who sent him the money. Sometimes shocking, sometimes funny, MARCHING POWDER is an always riveting story of survival.
    It's fascinating and brilliant!

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