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Thread: What's the last book you read?

  1. #2416
    That's so Shakespearean... Canoodlefish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kala View Post
    The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins.

    Published in 1868 and narrated from the perspective of eleven different characters, this novel has been described as the first and (one of the) best detective stories ever written.

    I love a good mystery but this book in terms of entertainment value goes way beyond the plot of searching for a missing diamond: Wilke's description of some of the characters had me in stitches to the point that tears were rolling down my cheeks. It's a long read - over 500 pages but the story never drags. 5 stars!
    Okay gonna get him and Virginia Woolf next year!
    "Never build a dungeon that you cannot get out of."

  2. #2417
    Princess Sparklefists Sansa Spark's Avatar
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    I just finished Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House and it was deliciously creepy.

    I've been in a bit of a reading slump, but I'm slowly getting back on track.

  3. #2418
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    I haven't posted here in a while. Here's what I've read recently:


    The First Bad Man by Miranda July

    OK, so July pretty much defines the word "divisive." I know people who find her so annoyingly precious that that they wouldn't go near this book with tongs. I get it, but I for one happen to love her. I thought her short story collection was wonderful, and so is this. She is very funny, and funny in a unique way. And beneath all of her quirkiness is genuine empathy and (at times) a darker sensibility than might appear at first.

    Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

    It seems like some folks here didn't care for this. I actually liked it quite a bit, although I didn't love it. Some stretches dragged a little for me, and some characters were more compelling to me than others. That said, I thought it came together rather fluidly. It held my interest, and I found some of it moving. Good, but not one for the ages.

    Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg

    It's a quick read (less than 300 pages), but gorgeously written. It's about the lives of various individuals who have been touched by tragedy:
    a Connecticut house is consumed by fire before a wedding, and the bride's mother is the only survivor. The story is told from various perspectives. It's VERY sad, but also beautiful, profound, and moving. I LOVED it and strongly recommend it. Probably my favorite book I've read since Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Good Squad.

    And right now I'm reading Hanya Yanagihara's A Little Life. It is simultaneously difficult to read and difficult to put down. I'm a little over halfway through it. So far, I think it's incredible. I have a very high tolerance for things that are intense--but holy shit is it intense!

  4. #2419
    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
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    A Little Life impacted me so profoundly that I didn't even want to post about it. That book changed my whole life. It really did. It changed my entire mindset on my own abuse and my life and I cannot say how impactful its been for me. It was also one of the hardest reads in terms of intensity. I was a river of tears half the time, and when I wasn't, I was at the edge of my seat.

  5. #2420
    Slade House by David Mitchell.

    I'm not sure what I thought about this, to be honest. It's creepy and unsettling and the line-by-line writing is great. But...well, I can't really get too specific about what bothered me without being spoilery, but let's just say that the way it was structured and the general plot were...a little contrived, for lack of a better word.

    It's my first David Mitchell novel. The ideas and the line-by-line writing were good enough that I'm definitely interested in reading more of his books.
    "See everything as an illusion, and enjoy it even though you are not of it."
    ~Alanis Morissette, paraphrased

  6. #2421
    Queen of Spades Alamo's Avatar
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    Angelology - Danielle Trussoni.

  7. #2422
    I'm reading It by Stephen King for the first time and it's so damn good!
    "See everything as an illusion, and enjoy it even though you are not of it."
    ~Alanis Morissette, paraphrased

  8. #2423
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Markness View Post
    I'm reading It by Stephen King for the first time and it's so damn good!
    Ahh. The book that made me afraid of bathrooms for about 20 years. No exaggeration.

    The scariest thing that ever happened to me that really wasn't anything at all:



    I'm reading King's Bizarre of Bad Dreams. Short stories. Like his other collections, it's hit or miss. Some are gems, some are turds. One scared me so badly I had to stop reading it at night until I got to the next story. So thumbs up overall.

  9. #2424
    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
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    It was inspired by my hometown. TRUE STORY.

    http://stephenking.com/library/novel...spiration.html

    Last paragraph. I know that library VERY well.

  10. #2425
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    hey you know what else is scary as all fuck? Seeing this in person


  11. #2426
    Let them eat cheese flan Nancy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    It was inspired by my hometown. TRUE STORY.

    http://stephenking.com/library/novel...spiration.html

    Last paragraph. I know that library VERY well.
    This is really cool, thanks for sharing that.

  12. #2427
    Get Out The Dark Adam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    A Little Life impacted me so profoundly that I didn't even want to post about it. That book changed my whole life. It really did. It changed my entire mindset on my own abuse and my life and I cannot say how impactful its been for me. It was also one of the hardest reads in terms of intensity. I was a river of tears half the time, and when I wasn't, I was at the edge of my seat.
    I've had this in my stack for a few months now. I can't wait to read it and will read it as soon as I'm done with Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff. Anyone else read this one? I'm almost half-way through it and so far, love it.

    The last one I finished was Gillian Flynn's short story, The Grownup. Highly recommended. I don't think I put it down once ( it's only 60-some pages, I think) and is so well-paced and plotted. I read her debut novel when it came out and loved it. She hasn't disappointed since ( although Dark Places was a huge misstep ).

    I just went on a book buying binge myself and have SO much to read. I think I'll save The Nest ( it was really hyped for a long time and just recently came out) for the beach and will do Lovecraft Country ( sounds so intersting and original...you should really look it up) after A Little Life.
    The Landslide Never Brought, Brought Me Down

  13. #2428
    worth a million in prizes .chris's Avatar
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    I FINALLY FINISHED THE DARK TOWER SERIES. I've been reading the series for what seemed like forever. I feel like I deserve a medal. I was actually pretty okay with how it ended!

  14. #2429
    'If you existed, I'd divorce you.' spyk_'s Avatar
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    I read through them when I was about 16, got half-way through the final book, then stopped. The bookmark in still stuck in volume 7 on the shelf at my parent's house, and I found it when I was back there over Easter. It's taking procrastination to a whole new level. I should really finish it off, but of course I won't remember much of what has happened in the series up until that point.

  15. #2430
    'If you existed, I'd divorce you.' spyk_'s Avatar
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    A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson.

    This has been one of the most emotionally wrenching novels I've read in a long time. I loved 'Life After Life' and admired its looping structure and the attention to detail she put into re-creating the era. She has a way of making you love her characters so much, even as they keep surprising and disappointing you. 'A God in Ruins' is a really different novel, even though it deals with the same family. You might think from the blurb that it's more 'straight-forward' in terms of structure (it doesn't have the re-birthing device that 'Life After Life' does), but actually what she's doing with this one is in many ways more complex and even more impressive. She relates the seemingly ordinary life of Teddy Todd, who flies Halifax bombers during the Second World War, and of his immediate family and descendants. The plots flings back and forward like memory - she often uses objects as an anchor to take you on a loop through the next few decades and then back to where you were originally. There is a delicious irony in knowing so much about what is going to happen to the characters before they do, but she leaves tantalising gaps in the reader's knowledge and fills them in expertly as the novel progresses. I suppose many of the characters could be seen as personifications of their respective generations, and the novel as a whole has a lot to say about the 20th century, but it doesn't make the characters seem any less dynamic. I particularly liked reading about Viola, Teddy's wayward daughter who marries an addict and falls in with a hippie commune, and seems to not want anything to do with her two kids, Bertie and Sunny. Her journey through self-absorption, self-denial and onto a sort of redemption is incredibly moving. What I love so much about Atkinson is how she does so much without revealing it to the reader. Her prose are really clear, almost simple at times, but she always knows exactly when to pull back and when to go in for the gut-punch. A few times when reading this, I was engrossed in a scene without knowing how emotionally invested I was, and then the very last sentence of the chapter would make me burst into tears. I love this kind of confidence in a writer. I would recommend anyone who wants to read this to try 'Life After Life' first, because although both novels stand alone, there a little details and character points that I think come out more strongly if you've read both.

    For anyone who's already read the book:

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