Page 170 of 174 FirstFirst ... 70120160168169170171172 ... LastLast
Results 2,536 to 2,550 of 2599

Thread: What's the last book you read?

  1. #2536
    Butts. soignee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somewhere Swenglish
    Posts
    3,094
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea View Post
    I'm rereading Lord of the Rings for the first time in almost 20 years.
    aka as OH LOOK THEY'RE SINGING AGAIN

  2. #2537
    'If you existed, I'd divorce you.' spyk_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,688
    Quote Originally Posted by The Markness View Post
    I re-read Posssession by A.S. Byatt a while back and loved it even more the second time around.
    I have that on my shelf to read soon! I found it for £3 at the Waterloo bookstall (which is both my favourite place and my greatest nemesis). I went to a book talk recently about underrated novels and one of the panellists chose 'Still Life' by Byatt. I want to check that out too, because she spoke about it with so much passion. I thought I should read Possession first, having already bought it and all.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeEP View Post
    so i've been trying to read more to avoid twitter/descending into despair from the news. so here's a question: what's the last book you RE-read? or any favorites you love so much you've read multiple times. looking for some recommendations!

    Flesh and Blood by Michael Cunningham is mine currently.
    Deferring from the brief because not a novel, but I went to see an all female production of The Tempest on Saturday and it reminded me how much I love that play, and now I'm going to re-read it before seeing another production at the RSC in a few weeks. It's about sacrifice and hope and anger so could be a useful antidote to Trump-rage. See also, Julius Caesar if you want a very different sort of catharsis.

    (I can only really talk about plays because they're the only things I generally re-read apart from short stories. The only novels I can remember reading more than once are some H.G Wells' (Time Machine and War of the Worlds), 1984, Wolf Hall and Moby-Dick. I feel like there's still so much I haven't read. I'll probably go back and read a lot of the stuff I'm reading now when I'm in mid-life and/or have changed significantly.)

  3. #2538
    Butts. soignee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somewhere Swenglish
    Posts
    3,094
    I am annoyed at Possession, even though I like it and have read it, as it was an idea I had for a novel and NOW I CAN'T DO IT. I honestly preferred the past history characters to the more modern historian ones though.

  4. #2539
    And in the evening it's. . . Andrea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Where it's Wild and Wonderful
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by soignee View Post
    aka as OH LOOK THEY'RE SINGING AGAIN
    Is it bad that I read a few lines and then skip the rest?

  5. #2540
    Senior Member grapefruit_is_winning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,483
    The Daily Show: An Oral History by Chris Smith.

    Interesting look at the inner workings of TDS under Jon Stewart, as related through the voices of JS, the correspondents, and many of the internal producers and teams. Some of the most interesting anecdotes and observations came from John McCain, of all people. It's long but reads super fast. Couldn't put it down.

  6. #2541
    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,388
    The Devil of Nanking by Mo Hayder

    A well written, gripping and SUPREMELY FUCKED UP thriller. It was very very very disturbing. Not exactly the light reading I'd been hoping for, but I could not put it down.

  7. #2542
    Princess Sparklefists Sansa Spark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    indoors
    Posts
    513
    Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique, a multi-generational family saga set in what becomes the US Virgin Islands, centered in St. Thomas. Yanique explores love, beauty, and colonization. There are passages that would stand next to Toni Morrison's best, and some shaky bits too. Overall, really beautiful and thought-provoking.

  8. #2543
    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,388
    Possession by AS Byatt

    I had tried to read this book at another point and couldn't get through it, so this time I bore down and read it. While I recognize that its a staggering literary achievement (her replication of poetry from that time period is astonishing), and while I found the love story in the past to be sad and compelling, I found it a bit pretentious and lacking in emotional heft that the story really needed. I couldn't care less about fussy academics squabbling over archives, and that part of the book just went on too long. The present day love story didn't resonate for me at all, either. I am glad I read it, some parts of it are sheer brilliance, but overall I am lukewarm on it.

  9. #2544
    And in the evening it's. . . Andrea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Where it's Wild and Wonderful
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    The Devil of Nanking by Mo Hayder

    A well written, gripping and SUPREMELY FUCKED UP thriller. It was very very very disturbing. Not exactly the light reading I'd been hoping for, but I could not put it down.
    Thanks for this rec. It was on sale for the kindle so I downloaded it. Flew through it. Definitely a good read. Depressing as hell but ultimately redemptive.

  10. #2545
    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,388
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea View Post
    Thanks for this rec. It was on sale for the kindle so I downloaded it. Flew through it. Definitely a good read. Depressing as hell but ultimately redemptive.
    Glad you enjoyed it! Yes it was depressing but I found it super compelling and yes, redemptive.

  11. #2546
    The Vegetarian by Han Kang

    I read this disturbing little book in a day. A woman begins having strange, violent dreams; in an effort to curtail the dreams, she stops eating meat, but the obsessiveness with which she embraces the vegetarian life creates increasingly vicious conflict in her marriage and her extended family.

    The blurbs and buzz make out like it's some kind of deeply unsettling body horror story. It's not really like that at all. It's much more quiet and elegiac, and while the central character does say and do things that are bizarre and left mostly unexplained, the book reads overall more like a descent into madness/loss of self as viewed by external parties; the central character herself is never really a viewpoint character except for a few small sections in Part I. It's beautifully written and sharply observed, but there are jumps in time and switches in POV between each of the book's three parts, and for me, this really dissipated the very interesting initial tension.

    Anyway. I liked it, but the buzz had me expecting something a little more, I don't know, Lars Von Trier-esque. It was all much milder than that, while still well-written and sad and unsettling.
    "See everything as an illusion, and enjoy it even though you are not of it."
    ~Alanis Morissette, paraphrased

  12. #2547
    Let them eat cheese flan Nancy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4,188
    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    Possession by AS Byatt

    I had tried to read this book at another point and couldn't get through it, so this time I bore down and read it. While I recognize that its a staggering literary achievement (her replication of poetry from that time period is astonishing), and while I found the love story in the past to be sad and compelling, I found it a bit pretentious and lacking in emotional heft that the story really needed. I couldn't care less about fussy academics squabbling over archives, and that part of the book just went on too long. The present day love story didn't resonate for me at all, either. I am glad I read it, some parts of it are sheer brilliance, but overall I am lukewarm on it.
    You put that so well, Kari. The characters in this book are the kind I love more than anything, but it was all too pretentious for me. I like Byatt's short stories much better, because she reins herself in when she writes those.

  13. #2548
    condemned to wires and hammers ebby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    10,855
    Currently reading Derek Jarman's autobiography "At Your Own Risk" and it's super interesting how much of it highlights issues and concerns within the lgbt community that are very much still relevant today. As well as being permeated by a sort of quiet fury and overt anger in places, that is the voice of that community during and after the worst initial years of the AIDS pandemic. It's written in 1992, and it's a time that I'm not super aware of so this insider look into the lives of gay men from the 1950's onwards in the UK is absolutely fascinating. I guess a lot of what I'd read had been either USA focused, or from the Isherwood / Auden experience of Berlin between the two world wars. (also fascinating)

    But looking at pre-decriminalisation in the UK, and the experience of the public debate and the outcome afterwards, through to what the reality of the 70's was like and into the era of AIDS and Maggie Thatcher.. it's a definitely a super interesting read so far.

  14. #2549
    worth a million in prizes .chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,718
    I just finished Life after Life and A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson. I really really loved Life after Life. A God in Ruins was a fine read, but I didn't really get into the characters. The daughter Violet was insufferable. While I get what the author was going for with the ending, I thought it could have been done better.

    I'm currently reading Hope in the Dark by Rebecca Solnit in an effort to not be completely stuck in despair due to the times we are living in.

  15. #2550
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    283
    ^ I read Life after Life about two years ago and loved it, and now I'm slowly gearing up to read A God in Ruins. Have you read Jo Walton's My Real Children? It's thematically a little similar to Life after Life (I think I read them one after another, or almost.)

    My most recent book was Sy Montgomery's Journey of the Pink Dolphins: An Amazon Quest, which is an account of the author's travels in the Amazon region in order to observe elusive pink dolphins. It was very interesting at times, although a bit repetitive, and overall readable (but the style was annoying).

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •