Page 67 of 168 FirstFirst ... 1757656667686977117167 ... LastLast
Results 991 to 1,005 of 2517

Thread: What's the last book you read?

  1. #991
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami Beach
    Posts
    3,133
    Finished the 2nd book in William Gibson's Sprawl series-- Count Zero. Loved this much more than Neuromancer. The tech stuff was still a challenge to read, especially since I know nothing of weapons or warfare, but Neuromancer familiarized me enough with this Sprawl world so reading it wasn't as tough. Now, on to the 3rd book in the series-- Mona Lisa Overdrive.

  2. #992
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami Beach
    Posts
    3,133
    Quote Originally Posted by FaerieDreamer View Post
    It's NOT twilight. The triangle is there, but the books are so much more. Katniss is a much stronger protagonist, she is a female character girls can really be inspired by. It's such a great series.

    Kari, the second book is my favorite too.

    I liked Catching Fire as well, the only thing that really pissed me off was how Collins summarizes ALL of the first novel in the 2nd. It was kind of frustrating.
    Is this a convention of YA fiction? Does Harry Potter do this? (I've never read a book inthe series)

  3. #993
    Oy With The Poodles Already!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,047
    Potter did it a bit in the first couple of books, but maybe around midway through the series she just took up the story with the next year. There were bits that she'd pull in but it was less a summary and more as a way to keep the story moving forward, showing the way the kids are growing up.

  4. #994
    Let them eat cake! Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    1,255
    Whoo just finished The Handmaid's Tale! Now, on to Frankenstein.

  5. #995
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    10,099
    I just finished A Dance with Dragons

    While it wasn't my favorite in the series, I liked it ok enough and now get to join the "when is the next one?" torture.


  6. #996
    The Drama Queen of Pretentiousness! Ms. Shart O'Nay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Here. In My Head
    Posts
    927
    Late to the party, but want to offer a tentative corrective: there's a "love triangle" in Hunger Games only in the most vague, disturbing sense. In contrast to Twilight, the question of OMG TRU LUV just can't operate in the world of that series. I won't spoil anything, but because the sort of brute question of survival trumps everything else, "romance" isn't necessarily an operative concept. It's one of the things I found really fascinating about the emotional development of the characters.

  7. #997
    Let them eat cake! Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    1,255
    I'm reading Laura Esquivel's Like Water For Chocolate, and I'm not enjoying it at all. Such a shame, because I'd so been looking forward to reading it. Sigh.

  8. #998
    Oy With The Poodles Already!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,047
    Can I ask what you don't like about it? It's one of my favorite books.

  9. #999
    Finished up "Inside Scientology". Very disturbing and a well researched book.

  10. #1000
    Let them eat cake! Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    1,255
    Quote Originally Posted by FaerieDreamer View Post
    Can I ask what you don't like about it? It's one of my favorite books.
    I find the gender politics problematic. It's like, ok, let's critique repressive catholic sexual and social mores- how better to address this than to rely on a cruel mother and sister, the better to highlight our intrepid heroine's tearstained innocence? The fairytale conventions of the story- oppressed ingenue, wicked "other women"- just serve to reinforce misogynist poetics rather than critique or reconfigure them effectively.

  11. #1001
    Oy With The Poodles Already!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,047
    I do see what you are saying. I guess I never read it in that way, as a critique of catholism. I guess for me, being Latina, I very much related to what Esquivel was saying and the familial relationship is one that was (and is in some instances) very true and prevalent in Mexico at that time. To me, I think I read it more as historical fiction rather than any sort of critique.

  12. #1002
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami Beach
    Posts
    3,133
    Quote Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
    I find the gender politics problematic. It's like, ok, let's critique repressive catholic sexual and social mores- how better to address this than to rely on a cruel mother and sister, the better to highlight our intrepid heroine's tearstained innocence? The fairytale conventions of the story- oppressed ingenue, wicked "other women"- just serve to reinforce misogynist poetics rather than critique or reconfigure them effectively.
    But how do you account for all the weak men in the novel (Pedro, prime example) and all the strong women (Mama Elena, even though she is odious; Gertrudis) within the backdrop of Mexico at the turn of the last century. It's not like there were ideal conditions for women there. I think Esquivel's critique of gender is very nuanced: for example, that really great scene with Mama Elena's stand off against the rebels.

  13. #1003
    Let them eat cake! Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    1,255
    Oh, I haven't finished it yet! I'm not very far in, truth be told. It isn't really motivating me to read it. I'll take your post into consideration and try to forge ahead.

  14. #1004
    a little more time, endless time Savannah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    852
    The Blood Oranges - John Hawkes
    This man is such a great writer. It's a shame how overlooked he is in the American lit canon. This was such an unsettling book, from start to finish, about the dormant violence of jealousy. I would love to read another book as beautiful and complex about polyamory, but I doubt one exists.

    We Were the Mulvaneys - Joyce Carol Oates
    Finally settled on this one to start with out of JCO's massive bibliography. A very riveting account of the unraveling of a "perfect" whitebread family, the nature of predator/prey social order, the morbid and even sexual politics within families. I'm not done with it yet, but I probably will be in a couple of days, as I can't put it down.

  15. #1005
    worth a million in prizes .chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,018
    I'm right in the middle of James Baldwin's "Another Country." The only other book I've read by him was
    "Giovanni's Room." I am in awe of his writing. He has such a way with language. I cannot put this book down. Anyone else a fan of his writing?

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •