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Thread: What's the last book you read?

  1. #1141
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    Re Cersei's prophecy (not really spoilerish, but behind one for anyone who doesn't want to read ANYTHING about later books they haven't gotten to yet):


  2. #1142
    A Matter Of How You See It Kala's Avatar
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    The Silent Cry

    The 8th book in the William Monk Novel series. Another captivating mystery novel set in early Victorian-era London. I stayed up to the wee hours to finish it.

    As a side note, I just found out that the author was convicted of participating in a particularly brutal murder at the age of 15. She's in her 70's now, but still it's a bit of an eerie feeling knowing about that because I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all her books. I feel somewhat conflicted and need to be mindful of keeping separate the author from her work.

  3. #1143
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    The Night Circus. I heard great reviews of it, but I found it pretty dull. Nothing freaking happened, it seemed. The descriptions were done well, so you could "see" or "feel" what she was describing, but a few hundred pages of descriptions without much in the way of plot doesn't shoot this to the top of my favorite books. I can see how someone else might like it. I think it might make an interesting movie. But I was disappointed in it as a novel.

  4. #1144
    French boy Simon's Avatar
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    Is this by Angela Carter or this is something else ?
    Because I'm currently reading Angela Carter's one but I think it's titled Nights at the Circus in english

  5. #1145
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    This is the one I'm talking about:



    The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

    But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway—a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will. Despite themselves, however, Celia and Marco tumble headfirst into love—a deep, magical love that makes the lights flicker and the room grow warm whenever they so much as brush hands.

    True love or not, the game must play out, and the fates of everyone involved, from the cast of extraordinary circus per*formers to the patrons, hang in the balance, suspended as precariously as the daring acrobats overhead.

    Written in rich, seductive prose, this spell-casting novel is a feast for the senses and the heart.

  6. #1146
    French boy Simon's Avatar
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    Oh ok Sorry
    Thank you

  7. #1147
    A Matter Of How You See It Kala's Avatar
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    Jar City


    Translated from Icelandic, this crime thriller about a murder investigation in modern-day Reykjavík, a city where homicide is still fairly rare, is both fast-paced and entertaining. I am now starting Silence of the Grave written by the same author and again featuring protagonist Inspector Erlendur Sveinnson, a dedicated veteran detective who is haunted by personal self-doubts.

  8. #1148
    the last book I read was Peter Nadas' almost brilliant Own Death - my intro to his body of work before sinking into his enormous Parallel Stories. Own Death is a short but intense read fraught with existential musings.

    now reading McCarthy's The Sunset Limited.

  9. #1149
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    Thumbs down

    Beyond my better judgement:

    The Best of Me - Nicholas Sparks.

    It is absolutely super cheesy romance and I should have known. But I'm more than 1/2 ways through so I might as well finish it up so I can say that it was an absolute waste of my time.

  10. #1150
    ANUSTART Lathan's Avatar
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    I finally finished The Autobiography of Mark Twain: The Complete and Authoritative Edition, Vol. 1. (The book is about the size of a dorm fridge, so I got an ereader.)

    He's a great writer, he's witty and he knows how to tell a story for effect. I really enjoyed his writing. Which was about 20% of the book.

    The other 80% were introductory notes, afterductory notes, stuff he decided not to include (har har, editors), further reading, etc.

    On one hand, it was annoying, because I wanted to hear from him. In which case I should just read his works. Which I intend to.

    But on the other hand, as far as biographical information goes - it was very thorough and well done - Tops.

    He had it suppressed for 100 years after his death so as not to offend anyone or anyone's children.

    I found it SO interesting how much things have not changed. His "rants" about politics and corruption, banking scandals and greed, war and imperialism - they could have been written today. Funny and sad.

  11. #1151
    A Matter Of How You See It Kala's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kala View Post
    I am now starting Silence of the Grave written by the same author and again featuring protagonist Inspector Erlendur Sveinnson, a dedicated veteran detective who is haunted by personal self-doubts.
    Just finished reading this book which won the 2005 Golden Dagger Award for best crime novel. Two parallel story lines - one a heart-wrenching tale of horrific abuse and incredible courage taking place over 60 years ago, and the other a modern day police investigation surrounding the discovery of a half-buried human skeleton.

  12. #1152
    Is anyone else a Madeleine L'Engle fan? I've been re-reading some of my faves from adolescence and discovering that they are just as good when you're grown up. Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, Arm of the Starfish...my two favorites, though, are A Swiftly Tilting Planet and A Ring of Endless Light. I think Planet could actually be a really amazing movie, in the hands of the right director/writer.
    "See everything as an illusion, and enjoy it even though you are not of it."
    ~Alanis Morissette, paraphrased

  13. #1153
    asari scientist gyabou's Avatar
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    I looove L'Engle, and I did basically what you are doing a year or two ago. The big surprise for me was A Wind in the Door. It didn't make a big impression on me as a child, but when I reread the book, I was really awed by it. I feel kind of like it's L'Engle's best book. Very moving.

    Tor.com is doing a reread of L'Engle's works, which I've been following with a lot of interest. There's some pretty valid criticism of the books, though, particularly about the fate of adult Meg, L'Engle's depictions of minorities, and some of the sexism present in the Austin chronicles. The articles are great reads though and it's nice to see L'Engle's work discussed in detail.



    The Madeleine L'Engle Reread

    ALSO - I highly recommend you check out the audiobooks! They are read by L'Engle herself and really fun to listen to. She has such an old-fashioned American accent.
    Last edited by gyabou; 01-21-2012 at 09:14 PM.

  14. #1154
    Yeah, I've only read what seems like a fraction of all the books she's actually published...are there any lesser-known titles that I should check out in particular?
    "See everything as an illusion, and enjoy it even though you are not of it."
    ~Alanis Morissette, paraphrased

  15. #1155
    asari scientist gyabou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Markness View Post
    Yeah, I've only read what seems like a fraction of all the books she's actually published...are there any lesser-known titles that I should check out in particular?
    Here's a couple of the more obscure books that I enjoyed -

    Many Waters - Don't know if you've read this one, but it's really weird in the context of the other Murray books. It features the twins being sent back in time to live in a historical setting for Noah and the Ark. It made a big impression on me as a pre-teen. It's more mature than the other books in the series, and takes a really interesting take on Biblical times.
    Dragons in the Waters - features grown up Calvin, two of his kids, Canon Tallis (one of my favorite L'Engle characters), and some original characters solving a murder mystery on board a cruise ship.
    A House Like a Lotus - I liked this book a lot as a teenager but I suspect it wouldn't be as great on rereading it. Polly is pretty whiny throughout and there's some weird shit going on with elderly lesbians that I suspect would raise my eyebrow a bit these days. But that's probably a good reason to read it, too.
    An Acceptable Time - another Polly book, but I think this one is better than Lotus. You might like it in particular because it features the People of the Wind from A Swiftly Tilting Planet. Also Zachary Gray, being extra-villainous. (He's in House Like a Lotus too.)

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