Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 123

Thread: Literary news

  1. #16
    to the loneliest city in the world other pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    shatter shattered
    Posts
    5,960
    Amazing and brilliant news! As soon as I finished Bring up the Bodies I went straight back to Wolf Hall again, I haven't been this excited by a series since His Dark Materials. For her to take someone like T-Crom (sorry) who's been generally villain-ised in fiction and historical writing, and give him sympathetic level-headed motivations while filling in cracks in his scant biography, has been a revelation to me.

    I'll be fascinated to hear what people think if they read Bring up the Bodies first then go back to Wolf Hall as a prequel. A couple of people I cajoled into trying WH said they found it too heavy going at first. Perhaps the punchier timescale of ButB will make a good starting point?

  2. #17
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami Beach
    Posts
    3,117
    I'm about 100 pages from finishing WH, and I find it funny, exhilarating, clever, smart and a real fun reading experience. My one "complaint" about it is that the shifts are almost imperceptible, so it makes her HEAVY use of pronouns difficult to follow. I've had to read pages over 3-4 times just to get a handle on what is going on, that typically never happens to me.

  3. #18
    Fake news. beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,152


    Source

    I love Will Self.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  4. #19
    I hate Will Self.

    I guessed Bring Up The Bodies would win, and I'm looking forward to picking it up. I put off Wolf Hall because I didn't think I had the time for what many were calling quite an involved historic novel - Pete, are you suggesting BUTP (Butt Pea) could be enjoyed without having read Wolf Hall? I'm usually a stickler for following publishing order but we'll see. Maybe it will be fun to be reading the novel every other fucker in the country is reading.

  5. #20
    Tens Across the Board Banjee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami Beach
    Posts
    3,117
    Quote Originally Posted by other pete View Post
    For her to take someone like T-Crom (sorry) who's been generally villain-ised in fiction and historical writing, and give him sympathetic level-headed motivations while filling in cracks in his scant biography, has been a revelation to me.
    See, I wish I knew more about these historical figures. I knew a bit about Henry VIII, and one or two facts about Ann Boleyn, and that's it. I feel like I'm missing out on some huge jokes.

  6. #21
    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,393
    ETA: Wrong thread, sorry!

  7. #22

  8. #23
    to the loneliest city in the world other pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    shatter shattered
    Posts
    5,960
    The tower that (probably) inspired Tolkien sold to a community group for £1.

  9. #24
    to the loneliest city in the world other pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    shatter shattered
    Posts
    5,960
    Quote Originally Posted by other pete View Post
    The tower that (probably) inspired Tolkien sold to a community group for £1.


    ----
    It wasn't the most promising of pitches: when Ben Bradley suggested that a homeless charity buy a derelict, windblown Georgian tower in a poor district of Birmingham he expected, and got, some blank looks.
    The building is spectacular but perilous. It sways slightly in strong wind and its seven rooms – one on each storey – are the size of a hearth rug. But, said Bradley: "As it turned out, my CEO is a Tolkien fanatic, and so the deal was done."
    The Trident Reach the People charity paid £1, and became proud owners of one of the oldest and most eccentric structures in Birmingham, a building better known in Japan than it is on the other side of the city.
    The eyeball-shaped windows at the top of Perrott's Folly look down in one direction on where JRR Tolkien lived as a child, and in the opposite direction on the Oratory, where he went to school. It also gives a spectacular view of the other tower he passed twice a day, the gothic ornamented chimney of the Edgbaston waterworks, which in the writer's day would have belched smoke from the steam engines. To Tolkien true believers, there is no point looking further for the origins of the two sinister towers that loom over the world of his Lord of the Rings.
    The folly stood at the heart of a magnificent park when it was built by a local eccentric, John Perrott, in 1758. The pragmatic explanation is that it was a hunting lodge and status symbol, but legends insist he built it to look yearningly at his wife's grave 15 miles away, or that when she was alive it allowed him spy on her trysts with her gamekeeper lover. Conspiracy theorists point to the Masonic symbols in the ornate plasterwork of the top room, and there are tales of secret passages and underground chambers.
    As the city ate up the park, the tower became a weather observation station for meteorologist and glass-maker Abraham Follett Osler, and then became part of Birmingham University. By 1979, when the university finally locked the arched door, the building was already in a poor state. Repairs by a local trust saved it from collapse, and it opened on a few occasions for special events, including the centenary of Tolkien's birth, but Trident Reach is now launching a £1m fundraising drive to complete the restoration and open it permanently to the public.
    The Grade-II listed tower is taking over Bradley's life. He already has a more than full-time job – the charity runs accommodation and support services across the region, including a 97-room hostel that has more than doubled in size in the past few years to meet demand – but when he gets emails from Japan or Canada pleading for a visit to the tower, he gives in helplessly. If the Tolkien pilgrims can come on his Saturdays off, he responds, it will only take him about an hour to get there from home.
    He has climbed the 139 steep, narrow, winding steps so many times he dismisses out of hand the suggestion that the tower could earn money as a honeymoon venue: "When I do marry, I can tell you I certainly wouldn't want to carry my bride up those steps."
    He is also determined that the tower will not just become another stop on a tourist heritage trail. He urged the charity to buy it because it was such a source of pride and wonder in a district with pockets of the worst deprivation not just in the city but in the country. Already artist Lizzie Jordan is working with local groups on projects inspired by the tower: one man whose life was in chaos was so transformed by picking up a paintbrush for the first time since he was 12 that he now has his own flat, and has left the hostel a gallery of paintings which now cover the walls.
    Bradley dreams of groups from toddlers to pensioners painting in the garden, of a cafe selling 50p cups of tea to the mothers from the Sure Start centre across the road, of film nights with 20p tickets for the teenagers who are so gruffly proud of their extraordinary neighbour.
    "We're working in estates where the history is of agencies coming in, doing projects and pulling out again – essentially these places have been abandoned. We don't want the people here to think aliens have got out of a spacecraft and taken over a building which is, quite rightfully, theirs."
    "If all we ended up with here is four-wheel-drives pulling up and Mumsy, Mimsy and Wimpy hopping out for a quick look, and then driving away again 10 minutes later, as far as I'm concerned we'd have failed."
    -----

  10. #25
    carried by the sound emanate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,900
    Here are the winners of the American Library Association's 2013 Youth Media Awards, recently announced at the Midwinter conference in Seattle. These include the newest Caldecott, Newbery, and Printz medal winners and honor books, among other awards:

    http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org...-award-winners

    I also thought there might be some interest in the 2013 Amelia Bloomer list, which highlights children's and young adult books with significant feminist content and the 2013 Rainbow List, which does the same for children's and young adult books with LGBTQ content.

    http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org...-young-readers

    http://glbtrt.ala.org/rainbowbooks/archives/1025

  11. #26
    Lyrical acuity and mum-smarts menju56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,592
    Not 'literary' news really, but Hilary Mantel made some (unpopular) comments on Kate Middleton that have hit the headlines, including obligatory Daily Mail front-page outrage

    BBC article

    Prime Minister David Cameron has defended the Duchess of Cambridge, saying author Hilary Mantel was "completely wrong" to compare her to a "shop-window mannequin".

    Mantel said at the London Review of Books Lecture the duchess was "gloss varnished" with a "plastic smile".

    Mr Cameron added Mantel "writes great books" but "what she's said about Kate Middleton is completely misguided".

    Her speech was titled Undressing Anne Boleyn, referencing royal women.

    Mr Cameron added: "What I've seen of Princess Kate at public events, at the Olympics and elsewhere is this is someone who's bright, who's engaging, who's a fantastic ambassador for Britain.

    "We should be proud of that, rather than make these rather misguided remarks."

    Mantel said at her speech at the British Museum on 4 February that in contrast to Diana, Princess of Wales, the duchess appeared "machine-made".

    "Kate seems to have been selected for her role of princess because she was irreproachable: as painfully thin as anyone could wish, without quirks, without oddities, without the risk of the emergence of character," she said.

    "She appears precision-made, machine-made, so different from Diana whose human awkwardness and emotional incontinence showed in her every gesture. Diana was capable of transforming herself from galumphing schoolgirl to ice queen, from wraith to Amazon."

    Mantel, whose Booker prize-winning novels, Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies - which chart the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell, a powerful minister in the court of King Henry VIII - said she saw Kate becoming a "jointed doll on which certain rags are hung".

    "These days, she is a mother-to-be, and draped in another set of threadbare attributions.

    "Once she gets over being sick, the press will find that she is radiant. They will find that this young woman's life until now was nothing, her only point and purpose being to give birth.

    "Presumably Kate was designed to breed in some manners," she added.

    Mantel's most recent prize was the Costa Book of the Year Award for Bring Up The Bodies.

    She rounded off her speech by saying: "It may be that the whole phenomenon of monarchy is irrational, but that doesn't mean that when we look at it we should behave like spectators at Bedlam. Cheerful curiosity can easily become cruelty. It can easily become fatal."

    She added that although beheadings of "royal ladies" no longer take place, "we do sacrifice them, and we did memorably drive one to destruction a scant generation ago".

    "I'm not asking for pious humbug and smarmy reverence. I'm asking us to back off and not be brutes," she said.

    The lecture has sparked some backlash from the British press, with the Daily Mail calling it "an astonishing and venomous attack" on the duchess.

    The Telegraph's Jake Wallis Simons described the comments as "creepy" from an author who "should know better", while the Guardian called it a "damning" take on Catherine.

    Labour leader Ed Miliband also voiced his views on the speech, telling the BBC: "These are pretty offensive remarks, I don't agree with them.

    "Kate Middleton is doing a brilliant job in a difficult role. She's a huge asset to the country. She deserves our support in the rules that she's playing."

    However, Mantel received support a a surge of interest from people posting on the social network site, Twitter.

    Writer Jemima Khan defended the author, saying: "Interesting on how the Mail misread Mantel on Middleton," while Times columnist Caitlin Moran called the speech "sane and beautiful".

    There was also support for the duchess, who visited an addiction treatment in London for which she is a patron, on Tuesday morning.

    Nick Barton, who heads Action on Addiction, defended Catherine, describing her as an "intelligent" woman.

    Asked for his reaction to Mantel's speech, he said: "I don't think it's for me to comment on that kind of stuff. I speak of what I know - somebody who wants to help, is helpful and genuinely interested and is intelligent," he said.

    Last week, St James's Palace criticised Italian gossip magazine Chi after it published photographs of the pregnant duchess in a bikini, taken while she was on holiday with Prince William on the Caribbean island of Mustique.

    But its editor, Alfonso Signorini, defended the use of the photos, saying they were "photos of a young couple in love" and were not an invasion of privacy.

    Mantel has declined to comment on her speech.

    St James' Palace has also declined to comment on behalf of the Duchess of Cambridge.
    Guardian report:

    The award-winning novelist Hilary Mantel has sparked a row with a description of the Duchess of Cambridge as a "shop-window mannequin" with no personality whose only purpose is to breed.

    During a lecture at the British Museum, the double Man Booker prizewinner said Kate appeared "gloss-varnished", with a perfect, plastic smile; this was in contrast, the writer said, to Princess Diana, whom she described as awkward and emotionally incontinent.

    Mantel's remarks were made two weeks ago, during a lecture organised by London Review of Books, a month after her latest novel, Bring Up the Bodies, won the Costa prize. The lecture, entitled Royal Bodies, was on royal women under the public gaze across history.

    Mantel said: "Kate seems to have been selected for her role of princess because she was irreproachable: as painfully thin as anyone could wish, without quirks, without oddities, without the risk of the emergence of character.

    "She appears precision-made, machine-made: so different from Diana, whose human awkwardness and emotional incontinence showed in her every gesture."

    Mantel, whose latest novels are set in the Tudor court, said she saw Kate becoming a "jointed doll on which certain rags are hung". She added: "In those days [Kate] was a shop-window mannequin, with no personality of her own, entirely defined by what she wore.

    "These days, she is a mother-to-be, and draped in another set of threadbare attributions. Once she gets over being sick, the press will find that she is radiant. They will find that this young woman's life until now was nothing, her only point and purpose being to give birth."

    She also condemned Kate's first official portrait, by Paul Emsley, which was unveiled in January. The eyes were dead, she said, and the sitter wore "the strained smile of a woman who really wants to tell the painter to bugger off".

    During the lecture, Mantel went on to question whether the monarchy is a "suitable institution for a grown-up nation", in a society that sacrificed royal ladies and allowed them to be entertainment.

    A spokesman for Mantel told the Telegraph the speech was not a criticism but "remarkably sympathetic", with the author speaking about royal women as victims of their predicament. "It is a piece about appearance," he said. "It's about being trapped. It is about the performance, how the institution of royalty has to project and how it comes across."

  12. #27
    'If you existed, I'd divorce you.' spyk_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,688
    Here is the original, and brilliant, essay.

    http://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n04/hilary-mantel/royal-bodies

  13. #28
    Lyrical acuity and mum-smarts menju56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,592
    Thanks for that link, I'll get reading.

    I find it annoying, but unsurprising, that the bits about Kate have proved the focus and people have missed the point.

  14. #29
    Senior Member uncanny hats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,274
    Nebula finalists announced.

    Throne of the Crescent Moon, Saladin Ahmed (DAW; Gollancz '13)
    Ironskin, Tina Connolly (Tor)
    The Killing Moon, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
    The Drowning Girl, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Roc)
    Glamour in Glass, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor)
    2312, Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

  15. #30
    Senior Member uncanny hats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,274
    An interesting, but, also controversial, piece about poetry which seems to think that your poetry is worse than a fourth grader's poetry.

    Examples include:


    “The life of my heart is crimson.”

    [Writing about a family member's recent death:]

    “My brother went down/ to the river

    and put dirt on.”



    “Peace be a song,

    silver pool of sadness”




    “Away went a dull winter wind

    that rocked harshly, and bent you said,

    ‘Father, father’.”


    [Writing about a terminal illness:]

    “I am feeling burdened

    and I taste milk……

    I mumble, ‘Please,

    please run away.’

    But it lives where I live.”
    And the essay/blog post concludes with:

    The poet’s job is to forget how people do it.
    Is it?

    Marjorie Perloff's controversial article "Poetry on the Brink Reinventing the Lyric" suggests

    The demand for a certain kind of prize-winning, ‘well-crafted’ poem has produced extraordinary uniformity.
    and

    We have witnessed a return to the short lyric that depends for its effect on the recycling of earlier poetic material.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •