Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 86

Thread: Won't somebody bear witness - The Ana Silvera thread

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    over it
    Posts
    609
    wooHoo!

    Ana says

    Friends! There's only 5 hours left to download my album for free, or for a small donation Do it! here...www.anasilvera.bandcamp.com
    So there ya go

  2. #32
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    @AnaSilveraMusic
    working on an arrangement of 'Womanizer' (B.Spears) for my forthcoming concert - 27th February at St John's on Bethnal Green!
    !!!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  3. #33
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Ana has posted a little rehearsl video as a "sneak preview" of her gig in London on Thursday.

    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  4. #34
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Here's Ana covering Britney as promised last night:


    Ana Silvera - Womanizer (Britney Spears) (St. John On Bethnal Green - London - 27/02/2014)

    So great!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    over it
    Posts
    609
    Monday 2nd - Wednesday 4th June - Linbury Theatre, Royal Opera House - Draftworks Series - extracts from work in progress for Royal Ballet, 'Cassandra' INFO

  6. #36
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    ^ Cool. I'm seeing EMA on the 3rd but should be able to make one of the other days.

    Thanks for sharing!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  7. #37
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Cassandra!
    Choreographer Ludovic Ondiviela and singer songwriter Ana Silvera present a poignant exploration of what it is to be called mad.

    In Greek myth, Cassandra was given the gift of premonition, but cursed never to be believed. A modern Cassandra, disturbed by visions, is confined in a psychiatric ward. Is the treatment for her or just for others' peace of mind?

    In Cassandra rising star Ludovic Ondiviela – a First Artist with The Royal Ballet who has been turning increasingly to choreography – joins forces with singer songwriter Ana Silvera and electronic artist Joseph Hyde. Inspired by Wislawa Szymborska's poetry on the Ancient Greek myth of Cassandra, they explore the complexity and ambiguities of how madness is defined – and how it is treated in today's society.

    Ondiviela uses a lyrical language of dance to explore madness, and the alienation and stigmatization its diagnosis brings. He is aided by Silvera's hauntingly beautiful, folk-inspired music. By taking us inside Cassandra's head Ondiviela and Silvera question how we respond to behavior defined as madness and explore the contradicting emotions it provokes in us, from compassion and pity through to panic and fear.
    That sounds marvellous! It will be on 30/10/2014 - 01/11/2014 and tickets will be availble June - July depending on ROH membership. I don't have membership there but one of my friends does so I'll see if she wants to go.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  8. #38
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Ana did a BBC3 Late Junction session last night with Maya Youssef and Laura Moody and debuted a new song!

    Maya Youssef, Laura Moody, Ana Silvera
    Max Reinhardt's soirée features our ultra intriguing June session featuring Maya Youssef, Laura Moody and Ana Silvera...Qanun, Cello and Voice.
    iPlayer stream behind link.

    Podcast download.

    That. Voice.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  9. #39
    :: dutch oven :: wout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    3,865
    I can only listen to a snippet
    So she's working on new stuff? Yes please!!!
    post28!

  10. #40
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Ticket's for Ana's Cassandra are on general sale today London friends.

    Cassandra by Ludovic Ondiviela
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  11. #41
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Listen: Can the arts help people better understand mental illness?
    We speak to one of the creators of new ballet Cassandra, and to a consultant psychiatrist, about understanding and representing psychosis on stage.
    Singer-songwriter and composer Ana Silvera knows all too well the effect a diagnosis of psychosis can have on an individual, as well as their family and friends: her older brother was committed to a psychiatric ward when he was 15.

    ‘Seeing someone so close to me within the mental health system had a huge impact on me. I think through my work I have been trying to explore that state to put myself in his shoes, creatively, but also to explore how society reacts to someone in that state,’ she explained in the podcast.

    Silvera has written the music for Cassandra, a new ballet which has been choreographed by former Royal Ballet First Artist Ludovic Ondiviela and which integrates filmed material by Kate Church into the performance. The production aims to explore perceptions of mental illness and what it means to be ‘mad’.

    Consultant psychiatrist Dr Mark Salter has been working with the Cassandra production team. In this podcast, he talks about the role that the arts can play in helping people understand mental health:

    ‘I would say that art is the best hope we’ve got when it comes to trying to elucidate and clarify the dark, frightening side of the world. Good art is something that takes you to an uncomfortable place and brings you back feeling safer and wiser as a result.’



    Really looking forward to seeing Cassandra!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  12. #42
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Choreographer Ludovic Ondiviela on making mental illness the subject of his new work
    In the Royal Opera House’s airy MacMillan Studio, the young French choreographer Ludovic Ondiviela is rehearsing a pas de deux from his new ballet, Cassandra.

    The dancers Olivia Cowley and Thomas Whitehead are centre stage – but this is no typical ballet duet. The male character is clearly heartbroken, sometimes wrapping his arms around a figure who is not there. His partner drifts aside; he lifts and spins her, off-centre; her lines are broken, her gaze intermittently blank and disengaged. He tries to reach her emotions, without hope.

    Mental illness is not an obvious topic for ballet. But push at the boundaries and there is nothing it cannot express. Take the famous “mad scene” in Giselle, when the heroine loses her mind on learning that her lover has betrayed her; or Prince Rudolf, whose mental disintegration is at the heart of Mayerling; or Anastasia, another Kenneth MacMillan ballet, based on the story of a woman who believed she was the daughter of Tsar Nicholas II. These works suggest a rare yet compelling fascination with what “madness” really constitutes.

    In opera, the topic is equally perennial, from Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor (where coloratura vocal gymnastics portray the heroine losing touch with reality) to Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress, which concludes with a heart-rending scene in Bedlam. On 22 October a new opera by the composer Benjamin Tassie was premiered, entitled The Anatomy of Melancholy, exploring the links between physical and mental health. It aims to encourage us all to discuss these harrowing topics with more honesty and openness.

    Cassandra brings that idea right up to date through dance. Ondiviela has been researching the project for two years. “My grandfather had Alzheimer’s,” he explains, “and ever since then I’ve been interested in the relation between the brain and the emotions, and the way that sometimes mental illness affects the people around the patients perhaps even more than the patients themselves.

    “I started looking into the story of Cassandra because today someone who is diagnosed with psychosis is still said to have ‘the Cassandra syndrome’,” he adds. “It’s interesting that there is a very blurred line in society between what is considered mad and what is considered normal behaviour. We might all have behaviours that someone else would consider mad because they don’t relate to it.”

    The syndrome refers to the ancient Greek princess Cassandra, whose gift for prophecy was considered madness; the ballet mirrors that story in the present day. Its heroine travels through apparent delusions and paranoia, interacting with her workmates, family and lover, until she is hospitalised and, possibly, medicated. A contrast in physical language between the suffering individual and those around her becomes a vital element in translating complex states of mind into dance.

    Ondiviela delved into this by visiting the Homerton Hospital, east London, talking to doctors, nurses and patients and observing their movements. “We walked through the whole hospital, which was very important to get the feeling of what these very clinical and rather grim places are like,” he says. “I’ve tried to incorporate the physicality of some of the patients I saw, putting them into the ballet to make something realistic, sometimes ugly to look at and emotionally quite powerful; for instance, I saw a lot of people who had nervy twitches. I think there can sometimes be great beauty in ugliness.”

    Nor need the depiction of mental illness be entirely negative, he adds: “Sometimes these people go through experiences that are beautiful, spiritual and blissful. In one scene Cassandra goes into a kind of euphoria, … as if maybe she’s talking to God. If you see someone like that from outside you might be horrified, but to her this is incredible. And who are we to say that what she’s experiencing is not true? Maybe she really is speaking to God, but because we don’t relate we decide to call it madness.”

    On a visit to the Vortex jazz club in Dalston, north-east London, Ondiviela met the singer-songwriter Ana Silvera; they began to discuss working together and settled on the idea of psychosis and society’s attitude towards it. Silvera’s specially composed score was inspired by the poetry of Wislawa Szymborska on the legend of Cassandra; the singer herself appears on stage to represent the ancient prophetess as an imaginary companion to the dancer in the present day.

    “I wanted to show a clear difference between the way Cassandra communicates with the real people in her life and how she communicates in her imagination with the people who come into her mind,” says Ondiviela. “This was perfect. The real people dance; the people in her mind sing.”

    It was vital to avoid “madness” clichés: “You don’t want to be stereotypical ‘mad’ and ‘crazy’,” Olivia Cowley says. “You want it to be very subtle, especially as the Linbury is a very intimate stage.”

    She has stepped into the leading role at a late stage to replace the injured Lauren Cuthbertson, and has since been making the role very much her own. “It’s wonderful to be choreographed on,” she says, “because you take the natural movements that you feel you might do if you are going mad and Ludovic manipulates them. It’s going to take a lot of stamina, both physical and emotional.”

    Ondiviela’s biggest work to date, Cassandra marks his leap into the freelance unknown; after 13 years of dancing with the Royal Ballet he has resigned to devote himself to choreography. He and Cowley have known each other since joining the Royal Ballet School at the same time and are good friends: “It’s great working with Olivia, because she really ‘gets’ me emotionally,” Ondiviela remarks.

    Will Cassandra be cured? Ondiviela won’t let on, but remarks: “The question is, does she need to be cured?” As he says, the issue has many more shades than we might expect. If art can illuminate the darkest corners of the human mind and make us better able to face up to them, perhaps that is what it is really for.

    Ludovic Ondiviela the choreographer of 'Cassandra' at the Royal Opera House (Charlie Forgham Bailey)


    Olivia Cowley, the lead ballerina who will star in 'Cassandra' at the Royal Opera House (Charlie Forgham Bailey)

    Very exciting to be seeing it on Saturday!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  13. #43
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8,542
    Oracles performances and album!!!!


    Singer-songwriter and composer Ana Silvera performs an newly extended version of her BASCA-nominated choral song-cycle Oracles. These three concerts will be recorded for a 2015 album release.

    Since the release of debut album, The Aviary two years ago, London-born Ana Silvera’s mesmerising voice and mythic songs have enthralled an ever growing band of fans and critics alike.

    Recorded both in New York and in Ana’s hometown and featuring arrangements from Maxim Moston (Antony and the Johnsons), the collection of songs have been described as ‘haunting grown-up fairy tales’ (Metro) and ‘a stunning album’ (The Guardian).

    Mixing folk and classical strands with her own unique narrative style, Ana’s choral song-cycle Oracles was performed as a sell-out joint headliner with Imogen Heap on the main stage of the Roundhouse in 2012.

    The sold out show – also reprised the following night at Sage Gateshead – was hailed as ‘stunning’ and ‘captivating’ (Artsdesk). Oracles was subsequently nominated for a British Composers Award.

    As well as working on her new album, Ana is currently creating a piece for the Royal Ballet entitled Cassandra to be premiered in the 2014 season.
    EEEEEkkkkkkkk!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  14. #44
    :: dutch oven :: wout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    3,865
    New album! New album! New album! New album!
    post28!

  15. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    over it
    Posts
    609
    Seeing Cassandra tonight - can't wait for the new album

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •