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Thread: Star Wars: The All-Encompassing Thread of Threads

  1. #136
    HUH! HUP! HYAAAAT! Joey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Markness View Post
    The only things I didn't care for were:

    1) the pointless subplots (i.e. Finn and Rose) that bloated the movie needlessly.
    2) Some of the humor touches were way too broad/almost slapstick and, IMO, didn't really strike the right tone. Yes, the original movies had humor in them, but it was different. Some of the "funny" moments in TLJ felt like Rian Johnson was sitting right next to me, digging his elbow into my rib and saying "SEE, I MADE A FUNNY." Like...okay, lol.

    The rest of it, I either really liked or I need to sit with.
    Absolutely agreed.

    And, honestly, the movie could have been about 45 minutes shorter were it not for those pointless subplots.

  2. #137
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    Here's a spoilery look at the backlash. I don't know if I agree with every word, but I think it's a good look at it.


    The “backlash” against Star Wars: The Last Jedi, explained
    Why the latest film in the galaxy-spanning franchise has proved so unexpectedly polarizing.


    Too much progressivism: In the early going of the backlash, this was the easy culprit to point to. The broad strokes of the Last Jedi response sure looked like the broad strokes of Gamergate or the backlash to the all-female Ghostbusters remake. And there are lots and lots of tweets and user reviews and responses that focus on the idea that the film’s strongest characters are almost all women, who usually know the right thing to do, while its most evil characters are white men with complexes about being given what they think they deserve.

    In particular, as Dave Schilling points out at Birth Movies Death, The Last Jedi is more or less a metaphorical depiction of the baby boomer generation (a generation that featured a lot of white dudes — good and bad — in positions of power) handing off leadership roles to younger generations, particularly millennials, who tend to be more racially diverse and to advocate having more women in positions of power. The series’ millennial good guys are a young white woman, a black man, a woman of Asian descent, and a Latino man, while its millennial bad guys are two white dudes.

    But saying there’s a lot of cultural anxiety around this particular generational handoff is an understatement. And when you consider that Star Wars fandom has long been presided over by white guys, it’s natural this would lead to angry policing over what Star Wars is and isn’t. And that policing can be ugly and lead to toxic fandoms in which people who aren’t white men don’t feel comfortable.

    But while there’s a lot of this going around, and it’s tempting to write off the backlash as wholly defined by anti-progressivism, that also wouldn’t be accurate. There are plenty of other complaints and criticisms from fans that range from nitpicky to more concerning.

    ...

    What’s interesting about the critiques of The Last Jedi is how often, when you talk about them, many of the above criticisms fall away, and you’re left with a distinct philosophical difference between people who love the film’s insistence that the future can be better if we make it and those who don’t like the way it forces us to grapple with the sins of the past, with the way it argues the Rebellion might have won at the end of Return of the Jedi, but it largely upheld the status quo.

    ...

    An idea I’ve seen bandied about a lot online in the wake of the backlash is that Star Wars is for everyone, not just a certain subset of fans who feel a certain way about the projects. Whether you love Rey or Luke best, whether you think Jar Jar Binks is hilarious or not, whether you think Han shot first or not — Star Wars is for you, and for everybody who disagrees with you too.

    But having that big of a tent (and Star Wars just might be our last big-tent American pop culture thing) means you inevitably have to rub elbows with people who’ve entered the tent thinking something very different from what you think. If Star Wars is going to continue being a major force in pop culture, then it needs to keep adapting.

    But if it’s going to keep pleasing those who love it most, then it needs to stay preserved in amber (or, if you will, frozen in carbonite), leaving Luke Skywalker as the best boy who ever lived and continuing to tell endless variations on the story of a young kid from a nowhere planet who learns he’s part of the biggest saga of them all. But that kind of fetishization of what’s come before is the quickest way to kill off a pop culture artifact.

    The Last Jedi is about this tension, about the ways that generations uneasily give way to other generations and the ways we all learn to accept that our parents (or parental figures) sometimes have the right answers and sometimes don’t. It’s a big, bold, complex film, full of contradictory notes, a little like Empire was. I suspect, in time, it will age just as satisfactorily, but it’s also possible I’m wrong. Loving it means letting go, just a little bit, of some rosy past and embracing a future that might lead to disappointment.

  3. #138
    entertaining in its outrage Volta's Avatar
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    ^I read all that and I don't understand any of it. lol
    Who said you were evil?
    My SAT scores.

  4. #139
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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  5. #140
    Senior Member thestrand's Avatar
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    While I don’t think it’s the MOST important thing about TLJ it’s pretty damn impor—.... nope, even as I wrote that sentence I changed my mind. This might literally be the most important thing about this film.

    Star Wars is a part of our modern culture’s mythology, and it should change and grow to reflect our society. Our society which, fingers crossed, is giving women more representation and an equal voice at the table. I deeply hope lots of young girls are seeing this film and finding heroes in characters like Rey and Holdo. And I hope little boys are seeing this and feeling the same way. In fact, that might be even more important in some ways, that we get a generation of young men who think women are their badass, thoughtful, intelligent equals.

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/201...n-bechdel-test

    The Last Jedi stormed into cinemas at the weekend as the most triumphantly feminist Star Wars film yet. While The Force Awakens and Rogue One had terrific heroines, they were isolated, and barely spoke to other women. Writer-director Rian Johnson has delivered a film that’s funny, exciting, spiritual and true to the original essence of the series while also having well-rounded female characters who actually interact with one another. Both in terms of women and non-white characters, there’s a celebratory inclusiveness that seems entirely in the Jedi spirit.
    Last edited by thestrand; 12-23-2017 at 01:30 AM.

  6. #141
    After being told that this was far better than The Force Awakens, I finally got to see the film and was disappointed. It wasn't bad, but it felt like a confused, boring mess. Some of the things that most got on my nerves:



    Things that did work:


  7. #142
    werewolves, not swear-wolves Chalk's Avatar
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    I read this interesting article on Den of Geek about the masculine archetype played against wiser female leaders in the Last Jedi.

    [...]Poe's character, while not one of the main protagonists, has even more to do in The Last Jedi. However, while he may be filling the role of the dashing pilot that Han did in the Original Trilogy, director Rian Johnson is using the archetype to say something completely different about heroism, leadership, and—perhaps most importantly—masculinity.

    In the Original Trilogy, Han is presented as the ultimate dude. In heteronormative terms, he is the character every man should want to be and every woman should want to be with. In The Last Jedi, Poe is presented as a character who needs to stop with the mansplaining and learn from the more seasoned female leaders in his life.
    [...]

  8. #143
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    I would like to emphasize that I don't think people are wrong and bad if they didn't like TLJ, but I do hate certain TYPES of hate. This imgur board, TLJ Haters Strike Back, was a great way to show some of the inconsistent complaints, the laser focus on plot holes in the most recent three movies but the total blindness to similar flaws in the OT.

  9. #144
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    I didn't like the movie but I appreciate what Rian was trying to do. It is quite clever and subversive!
    I just thought the pacing was terrible and that the writers stretched some of those characters (Luke!) way too much. Also I don't care about Rey OR Finn at all (and I only care about Poe because Oscar Isaac is hot as fuck).

  10. #145
    Senior Member grapefruit_is_winning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akira View Post
    Oscar Isaac is hot as fuck).
    Right?! He's yes yes yes.

  11. #146
    worth a million in prizes .chris's Avatar
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    he is distractingly hot. I can't even.

  12. #147
    .
    Last edited by BrotherNamedErised; 08-01-2018 at 10:17 PM.

  13. #148
    UNbelievably Awesome Crispy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Regina Phalange View Post
    I would like to emphasize that I don't think people are wrong and bad if they didn't like TLJ, but I do hate certain TYPES of hate. This imgur board, TLJ Haters Strike Back, was a great way to show some of the inconsistent complaints, the laser focus on plot holes in the most recent three movies but the total blindness to similar flaws in the OT.
    Bish please, OT is flawless. /rolls around in bin of Kenner SW figs Uncle Scrooge style

  14. #149
    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    aghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh



    Their social media person is hilarious too


  15. #150
    Queen of Spades Alamo's Avatar
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    LOL!

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