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Thread: The "Woody Allen is Probably Disgusting" Thread

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    Join The Resistance Barbarella's Avatar
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    The "Woody Allen is Probably Disgusting" Thread

    *TRIGGER WARNING*

    An Open Letter From Dylan Farrow

    What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie? Before you answer, you should know: when I was seven years old, Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closet-like attic on the second floor of our house. He told me to lay on my stomach and play with my brother’s electric train set. Then he sexually assaulted me. He talked to me while he did it, whispering that I was a good girl, that this was our secret, promising that we’d go to Paris and I’d be a star in his movies. I remember staring at that toy train, focusing on it as it traveled in its circle around the attic. To this day, I find it difficult to look at toy trains.

    For as long as I could remember, my father had been doing things to me that I didn’t like. I didn’t like how often he would take me away from my mom, siblings and friends to be alone with him. I didn’t like it when he would stick his thumb in my mouth. I didn’t like it when I had to get in bed with him under the sheets when he was in his underwear. I didn’t like it when he would place his head in my naked lap and breathe in and breathe out. I would hide under beds or lock myself in the bathroom to avoid these encounters, but he always found me. These things happened so often, so routinely, so skillfully hidden from a mother that would have protected me had she known, that I thought it was normal. I thought this was how fathers doted on their daughters. But what he did to me in the attic felt different. I couldn’t keep the secret anymore.

    When I asked my mother if her dad did to her what Woody Allen did to me, I honestly did not know the answer. I also didn’t know the firestorm it would trigger. I didn’t know that my father would use his sexual relationship with my sister to cover up the abuse he inflicted on me. I didn’t know that he would accuse my mother of planting the abuse in my head and call her a liar for defending me. I didn’t know that I would be made to recount my story over and over again, to doctor after doctor, pushed to see if I’d admit I was lying as part of a legal battle I couldn’t possibly understand. At one point, my mother sat me down and told me that I wouldn’t be in trouble if I was lying – that I could take it all back. I couldn’t. It was all true. But sexual abuse claims against the powerful stall more easily. There were experts willing attack my credibility. There were doctors willing to gaslight an abused child.

    After a custody hearing denied my father visitation rights, my mother declined to pursue criminal charges, despite findings of probable cause by the State of Connecticut – due to, in the words of the prosecutor, the fragility of the “child victim.” Woody Allen was never convicted of any crime. That he got away with what he did to me haunted me as I grew up. I was stricken with guilt that I had allowed him to be near other little girls. I was terrified of being touched by men. I developed an eating disorder. I began cutting myself. That torment was made worse by Hollywood. All but a precious few (my heroes) turned a blind eye. Most found it easier to accept the ambiguity, to say, “who can say what happened,” to pretend that nothing was wrong. Actors praised him at awards shows. Networks put him on TV. Critics put him in magazines. Each time I saw my abuser’s face – on a poster, on a t-shirt, on television – I could only hide my panic until I found a place to be alone and fall apart.

    Last week, Woody Allen was nominated for his latest Oscar. But this time, I refuse to fall apart. For so long, Woody Allen’s acceptance silenced me. It felt like a personal rebuke, like the awards and accolades were a way to tell me to shut up and go away. But the survivors of sexual abuse who have reached out to me – to support me and to share their fears of coming forward, of being called a liar, of being told their memories aren’t their memories – have given me a reason to not be silent, if only so others know that they don’t have to be silent either.

    Today, I consider myself lucky. I am happily married. I have the support of my amazing brothers and sisters. I have a mother who found within herself a well of fortitude that saved us from the chaos a predator brought into our home.

    But others are still scared, vulnerable, and struggling for the courage to tell the truth. The message that Hollywood sends matters for them.

    What if it had been your child, Cate Blanchett? Louis CK? Alec Baldwin? What if it had been you, Emma Stone? Or you, Scarlett Johansson? You knew me when I was a little girl, Diane Keaton. Have you forgotten me?

    Woody Allen is a living testament to the way our society fails the survivors of sexual assault and abuse.

    So imagine your seven-year-old daughter being led into an attic by Woody Allen. Imagine she spends a lifetime stricken with nausea at the mention of his name. Imagine a world that celebrates her tormenter.

    Are you imagining that? Now, what’s your favorite Woody Allen movie?

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    Senior Member Jake's Avatar
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    Wow. That is extremely disturbing, but also powerful and brave.

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    Vilest of the vile Homogenik's Avatar
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    So did Mia refrain from pursuing criminal charges to prevent her child from having to testify? I can understand that but still it seems like it would have been a good idea to go ahead and push the charges, get it over with that one time.

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    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    I can see why she wouldn't have. Lots of parents don't push it when they're not famous. The media circus was intense when this story broke (I know a lot of you were super young or maybe not even born then). If they pushed it, it would have been terrible for all involved. So not pressing charges does not make me believe the story less.

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    Senior Member uncanny hats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homogenik View Post
    So did Mia refrain from pursuing criminal charges to prevent her child from having to testify? I can understand that but still it seems like it would have been a good idea to go ahead and push the charges, get it over with that one time.
    The police investigated and found nothing. And there's controversy about that. The letter, I believe, is in response to (definitely, trigger warnings) this, which is very quickly being called rape apologia all over the internet.

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    Loves ponies. Hates phonies. Regina Phalange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncanny hats View Post
    The police investigated and found nothing. And there's controversy about that. The letter, I believe, is in response to (definitely, trigger warnings) this, which is very quickly being called rape apologia all over the internet.
    I tried reading that earlier tonight, figuring that I should try to be fair, but I couldn't get through it. It is total bullshit. I've read some things too that are like "Mia's nuts too" and while that might be true, does it somehow mean that her family is immune from predators? I have a feeling I'm going to be full of rage in the next few days over this (or bored to tears by football and another shitty episode of Downton Abbey).

    Good reasons or not, they didn't press charges. While that might make Woody not guilty in the eyes of the law, it doesn't exactly exonerate him. There are myriad reasons not to press charges, and Mia's behavior (and that of the other children) is consistent with other families in this situation. It just enrages me when people (not you, Homogenik) just don't understand the psychology of victims and how hard it is to come forward.

    Plus I read a fascinating story yesterday about a woman who was raped by a stranger on the street. It wasn't even a lame "he said/she said" "date" rape thing. The cops bullied her and illegally questioned her several times, and also kept her from getting proper medical attention. They threatened to charge her with filing a false report until she admitted she made it all up. So going forward and trying to report a crime? Sometimes it's much worse for the victim.

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    Let them eat cheese flan Nancy's Avatar
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    ^ Well said, Scarlet. I'm in the "Mia's nuts too" camp but the article that nunu posted made me want to throw up.

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    and it sounds like all our lives Kari's Avatar
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    I think every person in that family is a fucked up mess, but that article really fell all over itself to re-victimize Dylan. Here's the thing: even if nothing happened to her, and Woody didn't molest her, she believes so strongly that he did that she was willing to put it in the New York Times. Writing yet ANOTHER worship piece of Woody Allen and summarily dismissing a pretty convincing claim does nothing to help Allen's cause, and it re-traumatizes a trauma victim. Even if Dylan's memories are false (I don't think they are but its a possibility), she has grown up in the god damn nuthouse, and it doesn't diminish her pain or suffering. That whole family is three sandwiches short of a picnic.

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    From a Vanity Fair article last year:

    Orth details the complex, intense, and ugly legal battle that followed, with the court proceedings and hearings dragging on for more than four years. Although Allen spent millions of dollars on legal fees, he lost two custody trials and two appeals. He also hired private investigators. Speaking anonymously, a top Connecticut State Police investigator on the sexual-abuse case says, “They were trying to dig up dirt on the troopers—whether they were having affairs, what they were doing.” The file for Dylan’s case in New York City’s Child Welfare Administration is nowhere to be found, someone close to the matter tells Orth, although it would ordinarily have been marked “indicated” to signify that it merited further attention—a potential red flag in allowing someone to adopt children.
    The above helps explain why Woody was never charged with child abuse. I completely believe that Woody Allen is guilty and I can't watch his movies anymore.
    Last edited by lioness; 02-02-2014 at 04:42 PM.

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    Vilest of the vile Homogenik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    That whole family is three sandwiches short of a picnic.
    what does that mean?

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    Remember. Steve SFM's Avatar
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    It's a euphemism for "crazy".
    At my core, I think we're gonna be OK.

    Barack Hussein Obama

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    Senior Member uncanny hats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kari View Post
    I think every person in that family is a fucked up mess, but that article really fell all over itself to re-victimize Dylan. Here's the thing: even if nothing happened to her, and Woody didn't molest her, she believes so strongly that he did that she was willing to put it in the New York Times. Writing yet ANOTHER worship piece of Woody Allen and summarily dismissing a pretty convincing claim does nothing to help Allen's cause, and it re-traumatizes a trauma victim. Even if Dylan's memories are false (I don't think they are but its a possibility), she has grown up in the god damn nuthouse, and it doesn't diminish her pain or suffering. That whole family is three sandwiches short of a picnic.
    Whether it's true or not, I think a lot of people get defensive, because they actually like Woody Allen's films. I don't have that much invested, I watched my first Allen film six months ago, but even if Allen is a genius of his craft (and I think he is) that doesn't mean he isn't a fucked up individual. Boy howdy, it appears a lot of really amazing artists are/were fucked up individuals. You could make great films and be a sexual predator just as much as you could be an amazing poet and a sexual predator (Ginsberg). I just hope peace shows up soon. Part of me wants to hear Allen speak, in his own words about this.

  13. #13
    Let them eat cheese flan Nancy's Avatar
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    Yeah well, apparently he doesn't even know what Twitter is. *eyeroll*

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    A Matter Of How You See It Kala's Avatar
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    And what's more, after Allen marries his former partner's step-daughter the happy couple go on to adopt two young girls. I hope those children are not harmed in any way by their famous father.

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    Senior Member uncanny hats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nancy View Post
    Yeah well, apparently he doesn't even know what Twitter is. *eyeroll*
    Yeah, I guess for me, and it's possible that it could be, if he's so self-absorbed that he can't address someone that he apparently loves (see the defense article and the mentioning of photographs), he has massive issues.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kala View Post
    And what's more, after Allen marries his former partner's step-daughter the happy couple go on to adopt two young girls. I hope those children are not harmed in any way by their famous father.
    yes, a trigger warning
    Last edited by uncanny hats; 02-02-2014 at 09:48 PM.

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