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Thread: Homeopathy - It works so well that having none is even better

  1. #31
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
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    Everyone had chemistry? Because this is going to have nothing to do with that.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  2. #32
    :: dutch oven :: wout's Avatar
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    I'm nowhere near a scientist but even I could tell that was full of crap.
    I did like her X hand gesture...
    post28!

  3. #33
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    Not homeopathy but near enough for purpose of thread.

    Parents face inquiry for treating son with alternative medicine
    A couple who treated their sick four-year-old son with alternative medicine are being investigated for manslaughter, Italian police have said.

    Luca Monsellato was taken to hospital with a high fever and cold symptoms but failed to respond to emergency medical treatment and died.

    His parents, Marcello and Giovanna Pantaleo, told doctors they had been treating his apparent three-week cold with fennel tea – a popular homeopathic remedy for coughs – in an attempt to keep his fever under control. They eventually took him to hospital when his condition worsened.

    Staff at the hospital described Luca as looking "pale, thin and breathless".

    Mr Monsellato, 52, of the southern Italian town of Tricase, close to Lecce, has been a doctor of alternative medicine for more than 20 years. He is honorary president of Italy's Homeopathic Sinergy Association and an expert on acupuncture.

    He told staff at the hospital how his son had been suffering from the effects of a cold for three weeks and they had given him fennel tea instead of other medical treatment.
    Prosecutor Alberto Santacatterina said: "A manslaughter investigation has been opened against the parents of little Luca. We are looking into the events that surrounded his death and whether they were responsible by not giving him proper medical treatment when he was ill."

    The couple, who have been bailed, have denied any wrongdoing through their lawyer, Alfredo Cardigliano, who said the family were thinking of bringing negligent charges against doctors at the hospital for not looking after their son properly.

    A message on the website of the Homeopathic Sinergy Association said: "We are united in our condolences to honorary president Dr Marcello Monsellato and his family for the loss of little Luca.

    "We fully support Dr Monsellato who in 30 years of practice has worked with love and professionalism with thousands of patients who have turned to him for help in dealing with the difficulties of their illnesses.

    "His figure incarnates the image of a doctor, whose only objective is the wellbeing of his patient."

    An autopsy performed by forensic pathologist Alberto Tortorella ruled that Luca had died from natural causes but police said they were still investigating his parents actions.

    Italy's Bioethics Committee also spoke out and in a statement said that ''medical practices that were not scientifically based could not substitute those that were scientifically proven.''

    However Fausto Panni, head of Omeoimpresse, the association which overseas the supply of homeopathic remedies said:''The latest statistics show that during the last five years just 21 people have had side effects from homeopathic medicine with no fatalities.

    ''That compares to many who have died as a result of medical malpractice or adverse reactions to medicine.''

    Homeopathy is popular in Italy with more than 5,000 homeopathic doctors treating more than three million people a year but it has no legal entity and there is no formal register of those who practice the treatment.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  4. #34
    werewolves, not swear-wolves Chalk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanstew View Post
    Not homeopathy but near enough for purpose of thread.

    Parents face inquiry for treating son with alternative medicine
    However Fausto Panni, head of Omeoimpresse, the association which overseas the supply of homeopathic remedies said:''The latest statistics show that during the last five years just 21 people have had side effects from homeopathic medicine with no fatalities.
    I bet none of them are children.

  5. #35
    it wouldn't even matter other pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Swanson View Post
    I bet none of them are children.
    Similarly, there are very low instances of people experiencing side effects from beheadings.

  6. #36
    How does one actually treat a cold virus? Not like antibiotics are gonna help.

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  7. #37
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
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    No, but if you are running a very high temperature (which young children often do), you should be using something like Tylenol to lower it. The combo of a high temp and dehydration is really dangerous for your health, particularly if you are young or very old.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  8. #38
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    Not Homeopathy but quacks using libel laws to silence criticism.

    The Burzynski Clinic is using libel laws to silence critics of its cancer treatment
    Last week, the Observer published an article about a family being torn apart by cancer and the devastating effects it has had on not just one, but two members of their family.
    Terri Bainbridge was suffering from breast cancer. Whilst receiving chemotherapy treatment, her daughter Billie began to show signs of an unknown neurological illness. She was later diagnosed with a tumour of the brain stem, a type of cancer called Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma. The prognosis for this type of cancer isn't very good at all. Children diagnosed with this type of tumour have a life expectancy of 12-18 months from diagnosis.

    Understandably, the family were distraught and wanted to do anything they possibly could to help their four-year-old daughter get better. They did some research on the internet and came across a clinic in Houston, Texas called the Burzynski Clinic, a cancer clinic headed by a man called Dr Stanislaw Burzynski that claims to provide "Innovative and cutting-edge Personalised Gene Targeted Cancer Therapy" as well as "customized treatment for over 50 types of malignancies". On reading this, in the knowledge that your daughter had no hope of living, why wouldn't you go here?
    The Observer article was not the first time that the Burzynski Clinic has been in the news recently, however. Other cases that attracted similar media attention include the Hope for Laura campaign as well as a similar initiative to send a teenager from Dublin to the clinic. The reason they need to raise so much money is that Burzynski's treatment does not come cheap. Alan Henness of the Nightingale Collaboration has taken a closer look at the cost of Burzynski's treatment in this blogpost.

    First come the lab tests on your genes: $6000 before you even start the treatment, according to patient information documents sent by the clinic. Before the initial consultation, there is another payment of $500, so that a doctor can read through your medical notes. When it comes to the consultation, $1000 needs to be paid to cover the consultation itself as well as another $4000 to cover the cost of lab tests. Next comes the deposit, after Burzynski has reviewed your results, of $10,000 to start what they term "basic treatment". Then comes the deposit for the medication, which according to the clinic can range from $7000 to $15000. The costs don't even end here. You then have to pay $4500 to $6000 a month, not including medication costs, for "basic treatment". They state that a treatment regime lasts on average 4-12 months.

    These are significant costs, but if you thought they were going to save the life of your four year old, you'd do all you could to raise the money, right? That's exactly what Billie's family and friends did. Numerous celebrities joined in to help raise the cash to send Billie to this clinic.

    But there is a little known, unmentioned caveat with Burzynski's antineoplaston therapy – the treatment he developed in the late 1960s. Burzynski noticed that cancer patients had significant differences with peptides (amino acid chains) in their blood compared with healthy people. He also noticed that they were present in urine of healthy people. He decided to extract these chemicals from the urine and give them to patients in the hope that they would be treated of their cancer. He started to run a number of clinical trials.

    However, no independent studies have confirmed what few results Burzynski has published. His treatment has been called "scientific nonsense" by Dr Howard Ozer, director of the Allegheny Cancer Center in Philadelphia. As antineoplaston therapy is still in clinical trials and not licensed as a treatment of any disease, Burzynski isn't allowed to sell them. He is, however, allowed to continually run more and more trials. In this setting, he can charge for the privilege of joining these trials. It's not looking promising for this treatment.

    A number of people, including Cancer Research UK, have raised concerns about Burzynski and the endless campaigns to raise hundreds of thousands of pounds to send seriously ill cancer patients half way across the world to be treated with drugs that haven't been proved to work. I wrote a scathing post about his treatment in August.

    However, two months later, I received a threatening email from a Marc Stephens, claiming to represent Burzynski, the Burzynski Clinic and the Burzynski Research Institute. He was threatening me with a libel lawsuit if I didn't immediately remove any and all references to his clients from my blog and Twitter. Other bloggers, sceptical of Burzynski and his antineoplaston therapy received similar threats from Stephens. Andy Lewis of quackometer.net has written about his dealings with Stephens here.

    It seems that instead of dealing with criticisms about his treatments, Stanislaw Burzynski is only interested in silencing those with opinions contrary to his by using libel laws. Again, this is another case demonstrating the need for libel reform. Scientific disputes should not be determined in courts, but in journals.

    I leave you with a quote that sums up exactly how I feel about using libel laws in this way:

    "[Plaintiffs] cannot, by simply filing suit and crying 'character assassination!', silence those who hold divergent views, no matter how adverse those views may be to plaintiffs' interests. Scientific controversies must be settled by the methods of science rather than by the methods of litigation. … More papers, more discussion, better data, and more satisfactory models – not larger awards of damages – mark the path towards superior understanding of the world around us." – US Chief Justice Frank Easterbrook, Underwager v Salter 22 Fed. 3d 730 (1994)
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  9. #39
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
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    Nevermind the fact that the doctor is clearly a quack, because no reputable doctor would have all those charges for things that haven't even happened yet, but NO, you don't charge people "for the privilege of joining trials." That's not ethical and no trials approved to be conducted in this country ever, ever operate in that manner. It wouldn't be likely to be approved by a review board (which makes me wonder which one he uses).
    Last edited by Churumbela; 12-01-2011 at 10:50 PM.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  10. #40
    it wouldn't even matter other pete's Avatar
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    These kind of people are atrocious in their narrow mindedness, despite all their talk of being radical alternatives. A former work colleague's family took on colossal debts for a similar "trial" that they found through some magazine, which did nothing to help and probably harmed a family member in what "conventional" doctors had explained were his final weeks.

    Again and again there are stories with headlines like "I defied death sentence from my doctor", it's as if we forget that there's a reason you dont see interviews with the patients for whom the doctor's "death sentence" was perfectly accurate. Not that I'm opposed to hope! But desperation + a renegade pharmacologist with absolute faith in their own pet project = a wide open door for advantage-taking. It's no wonder they fight so maliciously to defend their brand.

  11. #41
    waited with a glacier's patience Churumbela's Avatar
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    And it pisses me off even more because it gives clinical trials such a bad name. We don't make any money off the trials we run, we do them purely for scientific benefit. But because of people like this guy and the experience you mention, they get a really bad reputation.
    I am the beginning. The end. The one that is many.

  12. #42
    she said destroy Lágnætti's Avatar
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    Celebrities queuing up to support that kind of thing reminds me of how they'd read out any old bollocks with absolute earnestness and conviction for Chris Morris on Brass Eye.

  13. #43
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    The "shatner's bassoon" bit cracks me up every time.
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  14. #44
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    Why are all our children getting measles, ask Homeopathy fans
    Child measles cases in the UK have risen tenfold, especially among families led by morons who think that crystals are magic and that sugar pills can cure AIDS.

    With MMR vaccinations dropping well below the 95% needed to prevent outbreaks spreading in the community, people who don’t believe in ‘that science stuff’ have been urged not to try and kill their baby.

    A Health Protection Agency spokesperson explained, “We set our target at 95%, because there are always going to 5% who are the sorts of imbeciles that bark at passing cars and point at the sky when a plane goes overhead.”

    “Teaching them about modern medicine techniques is like trying to teach a dog how to do long division. It’s best we just write-off their children, they won’t be contributing much to the gene pool anyway.”

    “But then there are the whack-jobs who would prefer to seek their medical protection and treatment from someone who runs a website selling sugar pills to poor African people.”

    “For some reason, they’re struggling to get their heads around the concept that not adopting modern medicinal treatments leads to lots and lots of sick babies. It’s a bit of leap, but we’re hoping they’ll get there eventually.”

    Deidre Matthews, a mother of three children suffering from Measles told us, “I don’t get it. They’ll all been taking the homeopathic remedy for weeks, with little improvement.”

    “The healing crystals have barely left their skin and I’ve paid a small fortune in Reiki treatments for them – but they’re all still sick. I just don’t get it.”

    The HPA had the last word, telling negligent parents, “If we could take your kids from you, we would, but how about you just get them seen by a proper doctor and stop dicking around with the sort of witchcraft that is threatening the safety of every child your family comes into contact with – deal?”
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

  15. #45
    I am not a loony beanstew's Avatar
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    Letter to the FDA about Dr. Burzynski
    Since there is a formal letter writing campaign to the FDA to have Burzynski’s “clinical trials” investigated, I thought that I would post the letter I just snail mailed. (F*ing stamps, how do they work?) You will see some of my earlier post in this letter, but the FDA needs to recognize that Burzynski is openly and flagrantly making a mockery of US drug development regulations and scientific standards in front of the entire world.

    Constance Lewin, M.D., M.P.H.
    Branch Chief, Good Clinical Practice Branch I
    Division of Scientific Investigations
    Office of Compliance
    Center for Drug Evaluation and Research
    Food and Drug Administration
    Building 51, Room 5354
    10903 New Hampshire Avenue
    Silver Spring, MD 20993, USA

    Dear Dr. Lewin:

    I am writing because I am deeply concerned that the FDA has not fulfilled its mandate to regulate clinical research trials in the matter of the Burzynski Research Institute (9432 Katy Freeway, Houston, Texas 77055). Stanislaw Burzynski has been injecting cancer patients for years with “antineoplastons,” a derivative of urine, for well over 20 years and exacting exorbitant sums of money up-front (tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars per patient), yet he has never produced a single study that has stood up to peer-review. How can the FDA allow this unpromising line of research to continue?

    It is my understanding that a warning letter was sent to the Clinic’s IRB in 2009 for breaching good clinical practice standards on multiple accounts, but that no further investigation has been undertaken. Why has this happened? Furthermore, all the while he has been claiming to his patients that he has a 30-50% cure rate (see below). But where are the studies? Why isn’t the FDA demanding the studies before authorizing further research?

    If you take a look at the public record, Dr. Burzynski has assembled quite a record of getting people to raise enormous amounts of money for desperate causes that usually end in failure. In fact, every single patient that I have found in media coverage of Burzynski for the past 10 years, with a sole exception, is dead.

    On Nov. 1, the Irish Times reported that one patient had to raise EUR 50,000. Keith Gibbons’ friends are still trying to raise money, but I’ve seen no update of his progress.
    On 26 June, 2011, The News of the World reported that the parents of Zoe Lehane Levarde were trying to raise 1 million for treatment at the Burzynski Clinic (1 million to get into a drug trial?). Zoe is now dead.
    On 5 June, The Sunday Express reported that Luna Petagine needed to raise $20,000 to just find out if she was eligible for Burzynski’s unproved treatment.
    In January of last year, an 8-year old girl from Australia, who had raised $135,000 for treatment, died, according to the West Australian.
    The Evening Standard reported on 23 July that Wayne and Zorzia intended to take their son to the Burzynski Clinic. According to the article: “The clinic says its antineoplaston therapy, which targets cancer cells without destroying normal cells, could give Fabian a 30 to 50 per cent chance of survival. But the treatment will cost £100,000 for the first year and is not eligble for NHS funding. A spokesman for Great Ormond Street Hospital said there was no medical evidence to suggest it would be more effective than chemotherapy.” The poor kid died that September, having only raised $50,000.
    In March 2005, the Montreal Gazette reported that a five-year old girl, Raphaelle Lanterne, died after her parents went against medical advice and saw Burzynski.
    In October 2003, The Gazette reported that the parents of Antonio Luk were looking for $200,000. I found that his foundation raised $30,000. Treatment was $10,000/month. Antonio died in 2004. Featured in the same article was teenager, Wesley Stefanik, another patient of Burzynski, who it seems also succumbed to his cancer.
    On 29 September 2002, the Dallas Morning News reported that Burzynski patient Christian Titera’s costs were $13,000/month. The family raised $61,000. He died in April 2003.
    On 21 April 2002, the New York Daily News reported that Taylor Mouzakes’ family was paying $10,000/month. Taylor died in 2006.
    Mirjam Binnendyk, 24, went to Burzynski’s clinic, reports the Montreal Gazette in 2001, and she was happy with the treatment at the time, though the $200,000 price tag was an out-of-pocket expense. She appears to have died in 2008, but I have not been able to pin down the year.
    Brandon Hamm, reports the Dallas Morning News on Feb 17 2002, was delivered into the care of Burzynski. It cost his family $13,425 to begin treatment. “‘I just hope this treatment at the Burzynski Clinic has him up and running in a year like the other children I read about,’ said Ms. LeJeune [Brandon's mother], referring to testimonials on the Burzynski Clinic’s website.” He died the next day, and the death was reported in the paper on the 20th.
    From the Globe and Mail, 9 March 2000:
    “Jean and Tom Walsh also found Dr. Burzynski on the Internet. Their 26-year-old daughter, Andrea, had also been diagnosed with a fast-growing brain tumour. They borrowed $16,000 to start her treatment, then borrowed more. Andrea suffered severe side-effects, including high fevers, disorientation and constant thirst. When Jean complained, the nurses told her these were signs the tumour was breaking up. A few weeks later, she was told that Andrea would soon be back to work. “I can’t tell you how happy we were,” Jean recalled. Her daughter died two days later, on the plane on her way home. That was 2½ years ago. Jean and Tom are still paying off their debts.”
    In the same article, the Globe and Mail reports that Rosmari Brezak, whose treatment was projected to cost $300,000, after five weeks in treatment at the clinic, had a massive seizure and lapsed into a coma. She died on March 9.
    The St. Petersburg Times of 3 Feb 2000 said that the husband of 29-year old Tracy Bolton was attempting to raise $10,000 to take his wife to Burzynski. When she died on the 9th, her husband was reported by the Times as saying: ”If only we had gotten the money a week sooner, we would have been out there.”
    Norma Chaimberlain of Cardiff, reported The People on 26 July 1998, was receiving £4000/month supplies of intravenous antineoplastin, and her family was tasked with raising the projected £90,000. She did not live through the year.

    Need I go on? If the FDA is to play an important role in the development and maintenance of public safety, it must vigorously pursue practitioners whose methods are no more scientific than those of the goat-gland doctors of old.

    I appreciate your urgent attention to this matter and look forward to hearing from your department.

    Sincerely,
    Robert Blaskiewicz
    Atlanta, GA

    RJB

    Thanks to Rhys for retweeting this post. If you would like to give to a REAL kids’ cancer charity, one that turns nobody away, even if they can’t pay (unlike Burzynski), please consider giving to St. Jude’s. Let’s turn this cancer quack into an asset!
    Maybe for once, someone will call me "Sir" without adding, "You're making a scene."

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