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Thread: Maggie Rogers

  1. #1
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    Maggie Rogers

    Surprised she hasn't got her own thread yet. Have just discovered her. Absolutely in love with this song.


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    This is the moment she was "discovered", by Pharrell Williams.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...minutes-alaska

  3. #3
    megaphone to my chest MikeEP's Avatar
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    i've been playing Alaska a ton since i first heard it but haven't really got into the rest of her stuff yet.

  4. #4
    I got her first album, Blood Ballet, from her website. It isn't available on Spotify, but it is worth every penny and is so beautiful! Check out James...such a classic!

    James

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    ^ thanks for this. She's amazing. I haven't loved an artist as instantly since I first heard Tori in 1992. I just managed to get tickets to see her in London later this month.

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    Wow, what an interesting and talented young woman

    You can listen to her earlier albums on her bandcamp websites:
    Blood Ballet (2014): https://maggierogers.bandcamp.com/album/blood-ballet
    The Echo (2012): https://maggierogers.bandcamp.com/album/the-echo

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    I'm seeing Maggie tomorrow at the Electric in Brixton. Can't wait.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JamieC View Post
    I'm seeing Maggie tomorrow at the Electric in Brixton. Can't wait.
    Oh great - please write how you liked it.
    She will be in Hamburg next week and I am not sure yet if I should and can manage to go there...

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    Quote Originally Posted by CC View Post
    Oh great - please write how you liked it.
    She will be in Hamburg next week and I am not sure yet if I should and can manage to go there...
    Ok so: do whatever you have to do to get there. Beg, steal or borrow. She was sensational.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JamieC View Post
    Ok so: do whatever you have to do to get there. Beg, steal or borrow. She was sensational.
    ohhhh that is tempting me even MORE :-))))
    what did you like best?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CC View Post
    ohhhh that is tempting me even MORE :-))))
    what did you like best?
    I didn't know lots of stuff - am guessing it was from her album, whenever that's coming out. Alaska was amazing, obviously, and so was On & Off. But she did some stripped back acoustic songs which were really beautiful too. She has an amazing, pure voice and a tremendous energy on stage. She seemed so excited to be there. Do go see her if you can.

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    An electric Joni Mitchell: why Maggie Rogers is the great hope of Glastonbury
    Glastonbury will be her first festival but the singer is unfazed — she already counts Pharrell Williams and the Mumfords as fans

    Ed Potton
    June 21 2017, 12:01am,
    The Times
    Maggie Rogers: “A friend of mine said that festivals are an awesome excuse to be the loudest version of yourself”


    Maggie Rogers has never played a festival before, which is no surprise given that she’s only 23 and is barely out of music school. The freckled, flaxen-haired singer-songwriter from Maryland is about to break her duck in spectacular fashion, though, when she plays Glastonbury on Saturday. Whatever happened to building up slowly?

    You’d think that she might be quaking a little at the prospect of facing the Pilton hordes but this is a woman whose bewitching electronic folk has been endorsed by Pharrell Williams, Lorde and Mumford and Sons. She clearly can’t wait for Glastonbury, and a mark of her confidence is that she’ll be taking the stage dressed like a hippy superhero.

    Rogers lays down her knife and fork at a hipster restaurant in east London and gets out a white cape emblazoned with a multicoloured motif of suns, moons, birds and leaves. “There’s a jumpsuit to match,” she says with a grin. Inspired by Henri Matisse’s priest robes, the outfit was designed for her by Christian Joy, who makes clothes for some of the hippest frontwomen in music: Karen O of Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes.

    “A friend of mine said that festivals are an awesome excuse to be the loudest version of yourself,” Rogers says. “Also, costume is really important at festivals because you don’t have any stage production: there’s no lights, projection, it’s just you. If you’re one of the lucky later people maybe you’ll get some fog.”

    It’s this precocious blend of self-assurance, savviness and individuality that helped to win Rogers her diverse group of famous fans. Lorde has admiringly tweeted some of her lyrics and advised her on the pressures of touring. “She has been so lovely,” Rogers says. The two have been compared, which Rogers says is “incredibly flattering”, although the only similarities she can see are that “we’re about the same age and individual females in control of their own work”.


    Meanwhile, Ben Lovett of Mumford and Sons booked her to play on the Mumfords’ stage at the Latitude festival in July and offered reassuring words on balancing work and play. “I spent a lot of time this year being overwhelmed because all this happened so quickly,” she says. “Ben was being great about just chilling out.”

    Then, most famously, there’s Williams, who gave Rogers the kind of publicity that money can’t buy when he made a guest appearance last year at the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music at New York University (NYU), where she was a student. She had been asked to bring one of her songs to play in class, unaware that the ten-times Grammy winner would be listening and offering his opinion. The song in question, then unfinished, was Alaska, her transcendent tale of a hiking trip. Williams’s reaction, and her response to his reaction, were filmed and put on YouTube. It’s a touching if slightly awkward watch.

    Maggie Rogers in her custom-made stage costumeMaggie Rogers in her custom-made stage costume
    He goes wide-eyed, shaking his head in admiration; she looks at the floor and bops her head self-consciously. “I have zero notes for that,” Williams says after the song finishes. “I’ll tell you why: you’re doing your own thing.” Some would say that Rogers’s music brings to mind Joni Mitchell with beats. Williams makes a less obvious comparison, with the Wu-Tang Clan, on the basis of her startling originality. “I’ve never heard anyone like you before,” he says.

    The clip went viral and Rogers’s profile rocketed. She had already self-released two albums of folk to respectable acclaim, but now she was moving towards electronica and new audiences. “My demographic turned from 40-year-old white women to black nerds — because it was Pharrell and it went viral on [the geeky discussion website] Reddit.”

    I definitely got slapped in the face a little bit when I went to New York
    Soon she was being courted by executives from big labels; she talks wryly about having a succession of slightly weird dinners in posh restaurants with men old enough to be her father (“I had a lot of steamed salmon”). One executive, who had been tipped off about her love for modernist literature, gave her a first edition of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, which certainly makes a difference from a bag of cocaine.

    Nice try, but even that didn’t sway this frighteningly clued-up young woman. NYU had given her a 360-degree view of the music business — writing, performance, production, publishing. Her course required her to write a three-year business plan, which she is still following. By the time she graduated she had finished her first EP, Now That the Light is Fading, augmenting the songs with recordings of birdsong and a market in Morocco. She eventually signed to Capitol Records, but she owns all of her masters and has her own label.

    “The music business is so interesting to me,” Rogers says. “Because it’s a place where a 23-year-old woman can walk into a boardroom full of 50-year-old men and ultimately be the one in charge.” She’s no slouch at interviews either. Does she mind if I ask whether she’s single? “Yeah, I do,” she says amiably.

    Her worldliness is all the more remarkable when you consider the innocence of her upbringing. She grew up in rural Maryland, about two hours south of Washington DC, where her father ran a car dealership and her mother worked in healthcare.

    Rogers with Pharrell WilliamsRogers with Pharrell Williams
    Music was scarce when she was a child. “My brother had really sensitive hearing so we never listened to the radio in the car. Because of that I heard a lot of music for the first time when I went to high school: the Beatles, the Stones. There’s still a lot of classic records I don’t know, which makes me kinda embarrassed. I heard Michael Jackson and Prince for the first time as a 22-year-old.” How did they sound? “F***in’ awesome!”

    It’s not what you know, it’s what you do with it, and some of Rogers’s originality stems from her synaesthesia, which means she associates sounds with certain colours. It gives her an unusually visual approach to music-making, where mood boards are just as important as melodies. A new album is in the works.

    Rogers’s talent was nurtured at her coeducational boarding school, St Andrew’s, in Delaware, which is where Dead Poets Society was shot. With no wifi or mobile phones, the emphasis was on music and other wholesome entertainment. “I was 18, happily playing four square [an indoor ball game] on a Saturday night, or in a fort in the woods or canoeing. It sounds idyllic and it kinda was. I definitely got slapped in the face a little bit when I went to New York. I’d never met anyone who had ulterior motives.”

    Her learning curve was steep. She moonlit as a music writer, transcribing interviews with artists including Karen O, Jack White, Ryan Adams, and Julian Casablancas of the Strokes for a book, Meet Me in the Bathroom, by her friend Lizzy Goodman. “I was listening to all of my heroes,” she says. “I ended up learning a lot.” There was also a year in Europe for her degree, learning French in Paris and discovering house music in the clubs of Berlin.

    The latter proved something of an epiphany, persuading her to give her acoustic music a more electronic dimension. “I’d only ever thought about melody . . . suddenly I cared about drum sounds,” she says. “Rhythm is this incredibly primal release that connects everyone.” As Glastonbury will doubtless discover in three days’ time.

    Maggie Rogers plays Electric, Brixton, London SW9, on June 21 and Glastonbury Festival on June 24

  15. #15
    Militia of the Mind toriMODE's Avatar
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    I've watched both videos. Undecided if I like her or not.

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