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Thread: The big unforumzed TRAVEL thread.

  1. #1141
    'If you existed, I'd divorce you.' spyk_'s Avatar
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    It's some sort of symptom of being from an English-speaking country, I think. Many people only see media originally in English, and it doesn't help that so many areas that tourists visit understandably cater to the Anglosphere. I wonder whether any of that'll change during the coming century, as the global power balance shifts eastward, or whether English will remain as a sort-of international language (like Latin used to be). My year at school was the first not to be required to take a language option for our GCSE's (which you choose at age 13/14, so this would have been in 2004). I dropped French so I had an extra option free to take all three performing arts subjects as well as history, but I think it's a shame that I was allowed to make that choice. Learning a second language is not only so good for the mind but also improves flexibility in employment. Whenever I've travelled to mainland Europe I've always felt so restricted from only speaking English, even in places that supposedly welcome English speakers. I try to use my little brief jaunts across the channel to make up for my mistake at age 14 and learn a bit of the language, and I'm surprised when people don't use the opportunity likewise.

  2. #1142
    Alt Universe CliqueMember Spikey's Avatar
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    About Brussels, I was always mostly in the Flemish quarter, many of the locals there spoke English (I know because I was there often with a German friend who doesn't speak French or Dutch); that is why I advised what I did. Must not be really representative then.

    Even if you speak basic French or Dutch, it can be extremely hard to understand the two anywhere in Belgium. Their French at least I can hardly understand. Their Dutch, barely as well now that I think of it; Dutch is a very dynamic language. I find it amazing that - for example - I can well read a Shakespeare poem of centuries back, words having almost not changed - while I can't even understand a Dutch person from 100 years back. Unreadable. So, since English is so extremely static, it makes it a good choice for international language I think. For now, it is the language of both science and pop-culture, don't see that changing so fast.
    "Replies are a combination of nonsense, unrelated comments and inside jokes"‎

  3. #1143
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    I'll be in Oslo in two weeks.

    Any tips?

  4. #1144
    CMYK>RGB Stephanie's Avatar
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    Considering Iceland for March break with my husband and 10 year old. Fingers crossed!!!

  5. #1145
    Going skiing in Breckenridge CO for my partner's 40th birthday. Here's hoping I don't die on the mountain!
    "See everything as an illusion, and enjoy it even though you are not of it."
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  6. #1146
    the unhappy worker waitressboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dollsbitches View Post
    I'll be in Oslo in two weeks.

    Any tips?
    TAKE THE TRAIN TO BERGEN.
    With caps lock and everything.
    When he woke up, the dinosaur was still there.

  7. #1147
    werewolves, not swear-wolves Chalk's Avatar
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    ^^There wouldn't be much to see this time of year, unless you like snow.

    Quote Originally Posted by dollsbitches View Post
    I'll be in Oslo in two weeks.

    Any tips?
    Depends of what you like or what you want to do and how long you are staying. First and foremost, you need to visit the Opera House. You'll get a great view, and it's free. Just be careful it can get slippery this time of year. Other than that, I would say the Visit Oslo website has great tips and info in several languages. Don't be afraid to speak English. Most people here do, or if they don't they at least understand you. There are a lot of foreigners living and working here.

    If you like slalom/snowboard you can do that, at a place called Tryvann, which is half an hour journey (they rent boards and skiis). There is probably options to go cross country as well somewhere in the city, but I'm not a winter sports person, so that's basically what I can tell you.

    If you want to visit museums and that sort of thing, I would recommend getting something called an Oslo pass at the info centre (It's in the main rail station). It's worth it if you're considering visiting more than one and also free public transport in the city, and discounts on sightseeings, etc. It can get expensive otherwise.

    If you like art, our National gallery has great works of art (including Munch), and free admission on thursdays (closed on mondays). There aslo Astrup Fernley if you prefer contenporary art. The Munch museum is o.k. (it has been a few years since I last visited), but almost next to it is one of my favourite places in Oslo, the Botanical Gardens, which is a beautiful park (also free!) even on winter (and the green houses are open with free admission).
    There is also an open air museum which houses a lot of traditional buildings from all over Norway, if you're interested in historical architecture (it even has 900 year old stave church).

    There are plenty of great places to eat in Oslo now. It all depends on what you like to eat. I've also seen a surge in Bahn mi places, but have yet to try (vietnamese french inspired baguettes). Some of the places I've been to and go back again are:
    Burgers: I think there's a gourmet burger place in almost every corner of our city (and for what you get, it's not worth it going to McDonalds) - places I like is M Burger, Kverneriet (a bit pricey), Illegal Burger (tiny, tiny place, maybe confusing at first since you need to order first then find a place to sit or order to go). At Folketeaterpassajen there are plenty of good restaurants to choose from. Vietnamese (cheap and great): Lille Saigon 1. Thai: Rice Bowl . Dim sum and chinese (the dim sum is worth it, my family and I have been eating there for at least a decade and a half): Beijing Palace. Casual italian eatery, Taverna'n, and great pizza you get at Mamma Pizza, or Villa Paradiso (stay away from something called Peppe's pizza, and Dolly dimples - it's a chain restaurant and just don't.).
    If you want to try out more traditional-ish norwegian, there's Håndverkstuene, which roughly translates to "craftmanships room", and they also have great selection of beers.

    Of the bars I frequent, I personally love The Crow Bar (they have their own microbrewery) and Café Sara (which also has cheaper beer and good food), they are in the same street which also has great places to eat nearby. Other good places to get a drink is Kulturhuset (its in between Himkok and Taverna'n), The Dubliner and Amundsen. For cocktails and such I've been to a place called Himkok, which is the new and so fancy it doesn't even have a sign on the door, just the nr.27 and a symbol (I've been there, and I liked it. There are several floors and with a different bar. The atmosphere is not at all as pretentious as it sounds). Internasjonalen and https://www.google.no/maps/place/Tor...6!4d10.7521344.

    Now if you don't want to walk far to eat and drink (but frankly, most of the places I go to is within short distances, and Oslo is not a big place), there is the renewed Østbanehalled (where you find the tourist info), which has plenty of bars and restaurants.

    There are two, true shopping streets in Oslo - Karl Johan and Bogstadveien (the latter you can take the underground to Majorstuen and walk from there), and there is a big shopping centre next to the main rail station, called Oslo City.

    I hope my links work, if not just google the names. It's a basic norm nowdays that every info is online, sometimes in english as well.

  8. #1148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chalk View Post
    Depends of what you like or what you want to do and how long you are staying.
    Thank you SO much for all this info! Very helpful! I will be there from 18-21 January, so next week, 3 nights. I have an Oslo pass for 3 days. My boss advised me to take a train from the airport and NOT a taxi because apparently he paid like 160 euros for it (but this was 9 years ago).

    All sounds really great I might send you a PM to ask for some more restaurant recommendations, but Håndverkstuene already sounds interesting.

    Thanks again!

  9. #1149
    werewolves, not swear-wolves Chalk's Avatar
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    Don't take a taxi to Oslo, and generally you don't need in the city either. The public transportation is good and many types to choose from. There's a train every 10 minutes to Oslo from the airport and it's faster as well. You have the Flytoget (grey) train that leaves every 10 minutes, and there is the local train (red) that leaves about three to four times per hour. Both take 20 minutes, but the local train is half the price (you need to buy beforehand on the red ticket machine for the local one).

  10. #1150
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    Again, super helpful. Thank you so much

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